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Reading exercises

Books in libraryWhat exercises can you do?

For help with all these things, contact Charlie Martineau, the Language Support Tutor - send me an email languagesupport@yorksj.ac.uk

 

To get better at finding out quickly what an article is about

  • Read the title.  Look at any pictures, diagrams and their captions (the words underneath).  Read the first and last paragraph.  If necessary, check key words in your dictionary.   

 

To get better at finding out quickly what the main topics of the article are

  • Read the title.  Look at any pictures, diagrams and their captions (the words underneath).  Read the first and last paragraph.  If necessary, check key words in your dictionary. 
  • Then read the first sentence of each paragraph.  Often this contains the paragraph's main idea.  Then read more quickly through the rest of the paragraph to see if it is true in this case. 

 

To get better at making notes on an article

  • Find the main point of each paragraph.  Highlight it with a pen or pencil. 
  • If you want to mark details, use a different colour.
  • When you have finished, you can easily see all the main points in the article.  This helps you understand it well. 

 

To get better at guessing the meaning of words

As always, practice.  But how?

  • Choose the most common unknown words.  These are the most important ones.  If a word appears 25 times in one article, you know it's important! 
  • Look at the word and the sentence.  Is the word a noun, verb, adverb?
  • Look at the meaning of the whole sentence.  What meaning is logical for the words you don't know?
  • Do the same with other sentences which contain the same word. 
  • If this is very difficult for you, use easier material.  It's very hard to improve your reading skills with difficult texts - so use easier ones, for example graded readers.  Information about graded readers can be found here. 

 

To get better at deciding what to read

  • Ask your tutor for advice
  • Ask the library staff for help. 

 

To get better at using a library

 

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