HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Aaaaaaa
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Jane
1.3 Date of birth:
 
6 March 1971
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Performance
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The BA Performance (Hons) degree programme aims to:
  • Develop the students’ practical and theoretical interest, knowledge and understanding of established, new and emergent performance practices in the arts
  • Invite students to consider the political, social and cultural significance of performance making and spectating through the analysis of historical and contemporary practices by individual and/or groups of artists and the critics/analysts who have responded to, and perhaps influenced, their output
  • Encourage individuals and groups to creatively harness their intellectual skills and making skills to compose thoughtful, imaginative and articulate performance works for diverse audiences/spectators/participants and witnesses
  • Produce motivated graduates capable of contributing, individually or as collaborators, in the Creative Industries as well as employing their skills in a wide variety of presentational and interactive contexts
  • Inculcate the continued desirability and significance of embracing new learning opportunities.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3CA030   Theories and Contexts 5:Cultural Memory History & Identity  80   1 20  10 
  001 Essay of 1,500 words 75  1
  002 Project of 3,500 words 82  1

3CA040   Theories and Contexts 6:Independent Project  90   1 20  10 
  001 Dissertation between 5000 and 8000 words 90  1

3CA460   Acting for Theatre  75   1 20  10 
  001 Individually assessed performance presentation (within an ensemble context) - 5000 words equivalent 75  1

3CA491   Performance Practice 3: Live Art  75   1 20  10 
  001 Performance lecture (equivalent to 4000 words) 75  1
  002 Contextual document (2000 words 75  1

3CA500   Independent Theatre Companies Project  66   1 20  10 
  001 Performance (equivalent to 3750 words) 67  1
  002 Viva voce (equivalent to 1250 words) 63  1

3CA521   Performance Practice 4: Independent Performance Project  86   1 20  10 
  001 Performance (equivalent to 3000 words) 83  1
  002 Contextual Document 2000 words 90  1


2008/9

2CA040   Theories and Contexts 3:Identity and Difference  76   1 20  10 
  001 Reviews of two articles introduced on the module that consider identity and difference (equivalent to 2500 words) 74  1
  002 One essay of 2500 words 78  1

2CA050   Theories and Contexts 4:Power and the Production of Meaning  74   1 20  10 
  001 Group Seminar Presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 72  1
  002 One essay developing ideas from the presentation (2500 words) 76  1

2CA440   Theatre Production  78   1 20  10 
  001 Practical: Performance Production Process equivalent to 3000 words 80  1
  002 Performance equivalent to 1000 words 73  1
  003 Essay equivalent to 1000 words 75  1

2CA491   Performance Practice 2:Artist as Witness  76   1 20  10 
  001 Essay - 1500 - 2000 words 77  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 2500 words) 75  1

2CA500   Introduction to Directing Theatre  80   1 20  10 
  001 A 10-12 minute student directed performance extract (w actors from the Theatre Production model) (equiv to 3000 words) 80  1
  002 Directorial Journal: A 2000 word journal that articulates a specific directorial process from page to stage 80  1

2CA510   Theatre Research: Comedy  72   1 20  10 
  001 Seminar Presentation (equivalent to 2500 words). 68  1
  002 Essay - 2500 words 75  1


2007/8

1CA050   Theories and Contexts :An Introduction to Cultural Politics  66   1 20  10 
  001 Expanded glossary (1500 words or equivalent) to include definitions of key terms 72  1
  002 Portfolio (3500 words or equivalent) to include three critical accounts/ readings of cultural practices 60  1

1CA060   Theories and Contexts 2:Representation  73   1 20  10 
  001 One group presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 75  1
  002 One essay 2500 words that develops ideas put forward in the presentation 70  1

1CA440   Text Studies 1  74   1 10 
  001 An essay of 2500 words 74  1

1CA450   Acting workshop 1  68   1 10 
  001 Practical: Presentation of acting/rehearsal techniques (equivalent to 1250 words) 66  1
  002 Summative essay (Reflective Journal as appendix) of 1250 words 70  1

1CA460   Devising Studies 1  80   1 10 
  001 Essay (2500 words) 80  1

1CA471   Devising for Performance 1  65   1 10 
  001 Process based Assessment (equivalent to 1000 words) 66  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 1500 words) 65  1

1CA480   Text Studies 2  76   1 10 
  001 An essay of 2500 words 76  1

1CA490   Acting Workshop 2  69   1 10 
  001 Practical: Performance Presentations of acting techniques (50%)(equivalent of 1250 words) 70  1
  002 Reflective Journal on work issues raised in the module of 1250 words 68  1

1CA500   Devising Studies 2  81   1 10 
  001 Essay (2500 words) 81  1

1CA511   Devising for Performance 2  71   1 10 
  001 Process based assessment (equivalent to 1000 words) 69  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 1500 words) 72  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class I
 
  Classification average:
 
77.78
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 
Faculty of Arts Prize
Awarded to the student with the highest classification average in the Faculty
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 
Student Representative
Represents the views of students within their cohort, liaising with the University
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Bbbbbbbb
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Mary Grimes Devereux
1.3 Date of birth:
 
3 December 1950
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Contemporary Fine Art Practice
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The BA (Hons) Contemporary Fine Art Practice degree programme aims to:
  • Provide widely accessible opportunities for lifelong learning, underpinned by scholarship and research
  • Extend and deepen the University’s external contribution regionally, nationally and globally
  • Foster a supportive, creative, critical and reflective community, which promotes the personal and professional commitment of both students and staff
  • Provide a learning context that supports the development of students’ personal and professional fine art practice.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3CD010   Professional Portfolio  55   1 20  10 
  001 Presentation of a professional portfolio, in an approved format 55  1

3CD997   Special Study (20 credits)  63   1 20  10 
  001 Presentation of the dissertation introduction 55  1
  002 Presentation of the full dissertation at the end of the module 65  1

3FA011   Level Three Studio Practice  57   1 20  10 
  001 Exhibition proposal (equivalent to 1,500 words) 60  1
  002 Portfolio and presentation of resolved artwork 56  1

3FA021   Professional Arts Project  67   1 20  10 
  001 Portfolio and presentation 67  1

3FA031   Audience and Engagement  64   1 20  10 
  001 Portfolio and presentation of research (equivalent to 5,000 words) 0  1
  001 Portfolio and presentation of research (equivalent to 5,000 words) (deferred or re-assessment) 64  1

3FA041   Professional Exhibition and Presentation  59   1 20  10 
  001 Presentation of resolved artwork (equivalent to 3,500 words) 58  1
  002 Portfolio of supporting sketchbooks, documentation and contextual file (equivalent to 1,500 words) 60  1


2008/9

2CD010   Collaborative Practice  62   1 20  10 
  001 A report analysing the aims & outcomes of the collaboration & each individuals contribution to the work (2,500 words) 66  1
  002 A 20 min group presentation of the collaborative outcome/work in an appropriate format (equivalent to 2,500 words) 57  1

2CD020   Working in the Creative Industries  64   1 20  10 
  001 An essay on an aspect of the creative industries to be negotiated with the module director (2,500 words) 65  1
  002 A critical evaluative report on the process of finding the placement 62  1

2FA010   Inside the White Cube  60   1 20  10 
  001 Installation within the White Cube (equivalent to 2500 words) 58  1
  002 Portfolio of research / documentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 62  1

2FA020   Word Based Arts  61   1 20  10 
  001 Academic research (jounal and sketchbooks) into word-based fine art practices and image/word relationships 64  1
  002 Visual artefact(s) : performance, digital piece or installation (equivalent 2500 words) 57  1

2FA031   Intertextuality  64   1 20  10 
  001 Critical/analytical essay (equivalent to 2,500 words) 0  1
  002 Presentation (equivalent to 2,500 words) 58  1
  001 Critical/analytical essay (equivalent to 2,500 words) (deferred or re-assessment) 70  1

2FA040   Outside the White Cube  72   1 20  10 
  001 Documentation of work outside the White Cube in alternative sites 72  1
  002 Research & development portfolio of work associated with the project (equivalent to 2500 words) 71  1


2007/8

1CD011   Visual Research Methodologies  54   1 20  10 
  001 Submission of a portfolio of work, containing completed directed course/project work 54  1

1CD021   Historical Theoretical and Cultural Contexts  58   1 20  10 
  001 Presentation (equivalent to 2,500 words) 60  1
  002 2,500 word essay 56  1

1FA011   Drawing on Drawing  56   1 20  10 
  001 Portfolio (equivalent to 3500 words) 56  1
  002 Supporting sketchbook and contextual file (equivalent to 1500 words) 57  1

1FA021   Creative Digital Applications  56   1 20  10 
  001 Presentation of project work of a digital nature in relevant formats (equivalent 3000 words) 53  1
  002 Reflective journal of findings & own development within use of digital media in contemporary fine art practice 61  1

1FA031   Specialist Research and Communication  52   1 20  10 
  001 A practical project (equivalent to 2500 words) 52  1
  002 Essay on a subject concerned with the consumption of art (equivalent to 2500 words) 51  1

1FA041   First Studio Practice  53   1 20  10 
  001 Portfolio of work (equivalent to 2500 words) 54  1
  002 Resolution of artefacts 51  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class II Division i
 
  Classification average:
 
62.33
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
10 September 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Cccccc
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Katy Amanda
1.3 Date of birth:
 
25 March 1988
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Business Management: Marketing
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The Business Management degree programme aims to:
  • Develop critical and analytical understanding of business and management theory and practice
  • Foster the skills of research, analysis, interpretation, critical thinking and independent inquiry
  • Provide students with the opportunity to specialise in a particular aspect of business management for a named specialist award
  • Provide students with vocational competencies that meet the needs of students and employers
  • Facilitate personal development and the enhancement of skills in communication, team work, self management, organisation and problem solving
  • Provide students with relevant transferable skills, both conceptual and practical, to enable them to confidently address the demands of the workplace and the employment market
  • Enable students to develop progressively as autonomous independent learners and to foster intrinsic motivation towards the study of business management.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3BM020   Organisation Strategy and Decision Making  65   1 20  10 
  001 Analysis of a case study (2500 words) 72  1
  002 A test (2500 words equivalent) 57  1

3BM041   Leading and Managing Personal and Organisational Change  78   1 20  10 
  001 A critical review 3000 words 80  1
  002 Case study related to leadership (2000 words) 74  1

3BM060   International Marketing  73   1 20  10 
  001 Critical review (3000 words) 75  1
  002 Oral presentation (2000 word equivalent) 70  1

3BM070   Strategic Corporate Finance  68   1 20  10 
  001 Case study (2500 words) 73  1
  002 Numerical/Interpretive Workshop (2500 word equivalent) 63  1

3BM991   Research Investigation (40 credit version with 3BM992)  72   1 20  10 
  001 An oral presentation (1250 word equivalent) 68  1
  002 A research paper in a style deemed acceptable for submission to a named peer reviewed journal, to meet (5000 words) 73  1

3BM992   Research Investigation (40 credit version with 3BM991)  72   1 20  10 
  001 An oral presentation (1250 word equivalent) 68  1
  002 A research paper in a style deemed acceptable for submission to a named peer reviewed journal, to meet (5000 words) 73  1


2008/9

2BM010   Financial Management  66   1 20  10 
  001 A test (2500 words equivalent) 64  1
  002 A case study (2500 words equivalent) 68  1

2BM020   Green Business  63   1 20  10 
  001 A numerical/interpretative workshop (2500 words equivalent) 66  1
  002 A critical review of a relevant journal article (2500 words) 60  1

2BM030   Research Methods for Business  68   1 20  10 
  001 Test (2000 words equivalent) 55  1
  002 Research project (3000 words) 76  1

2BM040   Marketing Practice  70   1 20  10 
  001 Marketing report (3500 words) 73  1
  002 Oral presentation (1500 words equivalent) 62  1

2BM100   International Trade and Globalisation  62   1 20  10 
  001 An essay (2500 words) 75  1
  002 A test (2500 words) 48  1

2BM110   A Career in Business  64   1 20  10 
  001 A critical review of the students' own performance in the area of job applications and interviews (1500 words) 65  1
  002 A report on the work based learning (3500 words) 64  1


2007/8

1BM010   Leadership and Management  68   1 20  10 
  001 An essay in which theories of leadership and management are explored and related to experience (2500 words) 75  1
  002 A learning portfolio the aims and objectives of which will be agreed individually in a learning conract (2500 words) 60  1

1BM020   ICT and Study Skills  72   1 20  10 
  001 A test (spreadsheets and statistics) 2500 words 77  1
  002 Oral presentation with an accompanying written summary (2500 word equivalent) 67  1

1BM040   Economics and Finance  61   1 20  10 
  001 A report (2500 words equivalent) 62  1
  002 A test (2500 words equivalent) 59  1

1BM050   Managing People  70   1 20  10 
  001 A report 70  1
  002 Critical review 70  1

1BM060   Meeting Customer Needs  71   1 20  10 
  001 Oral presentation (2000 word equivalent) 78  1
  002 A written report (3000 words) 66  1

1IT110   Web Design  65   1 20  10 
  001 A web design critique (2000 words) 67  1
  002 A project to design and produce a web site containing textual and graphical elements on a theme (equiv 3000 words) 64  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class I
 
  Classification average:
 
69.39
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 
York St John Business School Prize
Awarded to the student with the highest classification average in the Business School
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 
Student Representative
Represents the views of students within their cohort, liaising with the University
 
Student Warden
Responsible for administration connected to Hall of Residence, first point of contact for students
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Dddddddd
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Amy Caroline
1.3 Date of birth:
 
24 August 1989
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Business Management
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The Business Management degree programme aims to:
  • Develop critical and analytical understanding of business and management theory and practice
  • Foster the skills of research, analysis, interpretation, critical thinking and independent inquiry
  • Provide students with the opportunity to specialise in a particular aspect of business management for a named specialist award
  • Provide students with vocational competencies that meet the needs of students and employers
  • Facilitate personal development and the enhancement of skills in communication, team work, self management, organisation and problem solving
  • Provide students with relevant transferable skills, both conceptual and practical, to enable them to confidently address the demands of the workplace and the employment market
  • Enable students to develop progressively as autonomous independent learners and to foster intrinsic motivation towards the study of business management.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3BM030   Tourism Policy and Planning  61   1 20  10 
  001 A report (3000 words) 58  1
  002 A test (2000 word equivalent) 65  1

3BM041   Leading and Managing Personal and Organisational Change  70   1 20  10 
  001 A critical review 3000 words 72  1
  002 Case study related to leadership (2000 words) 68  1

3BM070   Strategic Corporate Finance  65   1 20  10 
  001 Case study (2500 words) 72  1
  002 Numerical/Interpretive Workshop (2500 word equivalent) 58  1

3BM100   Managing a Diverse Workforce  61   1 20  10 
  001 Written assignment 3500 words 67  1
  002 Poster 1500 words 48  1

3BM991   Research Investigation (40 credit version with 3BM992)  67   1 20  10 
  001 An oral presentation (1250 word equivalent) 64  1
  002 A research paper in a style deemed acceptable for submission to a named peer reviewed journal, to meet (5000 words) 68  1

3BM992   Research Investigation (40 credit version with 3BM991)  67   1 20  10 
  001 An oral presentation (1250 word equivalent) 64  1
  002 A research paper in a style deemed acceptable for submission to a named peer reviewed journal, to meet (5000 words) 68  1


2008/9

2BM010   Financial Management  72   1 20  10 
  001 A test (2500 words equivalent) 70  1
  002 A case study (2500 words equivalent) 74  1

2BM020   Green Business  74   1 20  10 
  001 A numerical/interpretative workshop (2500 words equivalent) 67  1
  002 A critical review of a relevant journal article (2500 words) 80  1

2BM030   Research Methods for Business  70   1 20  10 
  001 Test (2000 words equivalent) 83  1
  002 Research project (3000 words) 62  1

2BM040   Marketing Practice  57   1 20  10 
  001 Marketing report (3500 words) 54  1
  002 Oral presentation (1500 words equivalent) 64  1

2BM070   Strategic and Operational Human Resource Management  64   1 20  10 
  001 Portfolio (3500 words equivalent) 64  1
  002 Oral presentation (2000 word equivalent) 64  1

2BM110   A Career in Business  73   1 20  10 
  001 A critical review of the students' own performance in the area of job applications and interviews (1500 words) 70  1
  002 A report on the work based learning (3500 words) 74  1


2007/8

1BM010   Leadership and Management  55   1 20  10 
  001 An essay in which theories of leadership and management are explored and related to experience (2500 words) 40  1
  002 A learning portfolio the aims and objectives of which will be agreed individually in a learning conract (2500 words) 70  1

1BM020   ICT and Study Skills  63   1 20  10 
  001 A test (spreadsheets and statistics) 2500 words 70  1
  002 Oral presentation with an accompanying written summary (2500 word equivalent) 56  1

1BM030   Service Industries: Leisure and Tourism  51   1 20  10 
  001 An essay (2500 words) 40  1
  002 A poster presentation (2500 words equivalent) 62  1

1BM040   Economics and Finance  63   1 20  10 
  001 A report (2500 words equivalent) 56  1
  002 A test (2500 words equivalent) 69  1

1BM050   Managing People  47   1 20  10 
  001 A report 40  1
  002 Critical review 53  1

1BM060   Meeting Customer Needs  55   1 20  10 
  001 Oral presentation (2000 word equivalent) 62  1
  002 A written report (3000 words) 50  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class II Division i
 
  Classification average:
 
66.75
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 
Student Warden
Responsible for administration connected to Hall of Residence, first point of contact for students
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Eeeeeee
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Sinead Laoise
1.3 Date of birth:
 
6 May 1988
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Performance
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The BA Performance (Hons) degree programme aims to:
  • Develop the students’ practical and theoretical interest, knowledge and understanding of established, new and emergent performance practices in the arts
  • Invite students to consider the political, social and cultural significance of performance making and spectating through the analysis of historical and contemporary practices by individual and/or groups of artists and the critics/analysts who have responded to, and perhaps influenced, their output
  • Encourage individuals and groups to creatively harness their intellectual skills and making skills to compose thoughtful, imaginative and articulate performance works for diverse audiences/spectators/participants and witnesses
  • Produce motivated graduates capable of contributing, individually or as collaborators, in the Creative Industries as well as employing their skills in a wide variety of presentational and interactive contexts
  • Inculcate the continued desirability and significance of embracing new learning opportunities.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3CA030   Theories and Contexts 5:Cultural Memory History & Identity  59   1 20  10 
  001 Essay of 1,500 words 53  1
  002 Project of 3,500 words 61  1

3CA040   Theories and Contexts 6:Independent Project  68   1 20  10 
  001 Dissertation between 5000 and 8000 words 68  1

3CA641   Music Musicians Audience  57   1 10 
  001 Group Presentation 54  1
  002 Critical report 59  1

3CA650   Music: Experimental Performance  67   1 10 
  001 Performance 67  1

3CA660   Music: Ensemble Performance 3  72   1 10 
  001 Contribution to performance (including rehearsals) 73  1
  002 Learning journal (750 words) 70  1

3CA670   Music: Ensemble Performance 4  70   1 10 
  001 Contribution to performance (including rehearsals) 71  1
  002 Learning journal (750 words) 67  1

3CA680   Music: Solo Performance 3  47   1 10 
  001 Presentation of solo instrumental/vocal performance 47  1

3CA690   Music: Solo Performance 4  47   1 10 
  001 Presentation of solo instrumental/vocal performance 47  1

3CA720   Contemporary Music  66   1 20  10 
  001 Essay of 2,500 words on a subject agreed with the tutor 67  1
  002 Group Practical Project. 64  1


2008/9

2CA040   Theories and Contexts 3:Identity and Difference  62   1 20  10 
  001 Reviews of two articles introduced on the module that consider identity and difference (equivalent to 2500 words) 64  1
  002 One essay of 2500 words 59  1

2CA050   Theories and Contexts 4:Power and the Production of Meaning  59   1 20  10 
  001 Group Seminar Presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 57  1
  002 One essay developing ideas from the presentation (2500 words) 60  1

2CA641   World Music  61   1 20  10 
  001 Essay on an agreed aspect of World Music 57  1
  002 Transcription (equivalent to 1250 words) 67  1
  003 Presentation of a research proposal 64  1

2CA660   Music: Ensemble Performance 1  56   1 10 
  001 Contribution to performance (equivalent to 1875 words) 61  1
  002 Learning journal (625 words) 40  1

2CA670   Music: Ensemble Performance 2  62   1 10 
  001 Contribution to performance (including rehearsals equivalent to 1750 words) 62  1
  002 Learning journal (750 words) 62  1

2CA680   Music: Solo Performance 1  54   1 10 
  001 Presentation of solo instrumental/vocal performance. (equivalent to 2500 words) 54  1

2CA690   Music: Solo Performance 2  58   1 10 
  001 Presentation of solo instrumental/vocal performance. (Equivalent to 2500 words) 58  1

2CA720   Music in the Community  66   1 20  10 
  001 Essay on an agreed aspect of music in the community (2000 words) 67  1
  002 Workshop devised for a particular community group 67  1
  003 Evaluation of placement through oral / visual presentation 62  1


2007/8

1CA050   Theories and Contexts :An Introduction to Cultural Politics  56   1 20  10 
  001 Expanded glossary (1500 words or equivalent) to include definitions of key terms 62  1
  002 Portfolio (3500 words or equivalent) to include three critical accounts/ readings of cultural practices 50  1

1CA060   Theories and Contexts 2:Representation  60   1 20  10 
  001 One group presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 58  1
  002 One essay 2500 words that develops ideas put forward in the presentation 0  1
  002 One essay 2500 words that develops ideas put forward in the presentation (deferred or re-assessment) 62  1

1CA632   Music Foundation  62   1 20  10 
  001 Critical study of specific musical texts - 2000 words 67  1
  002 Individual &/or group performance presentation (equivalent to 1500 words) 66  1
  003 Folio of compositions (equivalent to 1500 words) 54  1

1CA641   Music - Text  67   1 20  10 
  001 Critical written analysis of specific musical texts (1800 words) 70  1
  002 Individual and/or Group Performance (6-8 minutes). (equivalent to 2000 words) 64  1
  003 Analytical portfolio. (equivalent to 1500 words) 67  1

1CA651   Music Devised  60   1 20  10 
  001 Portfolio of Compositions (20 minutes) (equivalent to 2500 words) 58  1
  002 Individual and/or Group Improvisation (7-10 minutes) (equivalent to 1250 words) 65  1
  003 Critical Journal. (equivalent to 1250 words) 58  1

1CA662   Vox  68   1 20  10 
  001 Written analysis comparing a variety of vocal performances (2000 words) 67  1
  002 Group Performance(s) including some solo work (10-15 minutes). (equivalent to 3000 words) 68  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class II Division i
 
  Classification average:
 
61.61
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 
Student Warden
Responsible for administration connected to Hall of Residence, first point of contact for students
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Fffffff
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Charlotte Jane
1.3 Date of birth:
 
28 July 1987
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Contemporary Fine Art Practice
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The BA (Hons) Contemporary Fine Art Practice degree programme aims to:
  • Provide widely accessible opportunities for lifelong learning, underpinned by scholarship and research
  • Extend and deepen the University’s external contribution regionally, nationally and globally
  • Foster a supportive, creative, critical and reflective community, which promotes the personal and professional commitment of both students and staff
  • Provide a learning context that supports the development of students’ personal and professional fine art practice.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3CD010   Professional Portfolio  65   1 20  10 
  001 Presentation of a professional portfolio, in an approved format 65  1

3CD997   Special Study (20 credits)  64   1 20  10 
  001 Presentation of the dissertation introduction 63  1
  002 Presentation of the full dissertation at the end of the module 64  1

3FA011   Level Three Studio Practice  67   1 20  10 
  001 Exhibition proposal (equivalent to 1,500 words) 66  1
  002 Portfolio and presentation of resolved artwork 68  1

3FA021   Professional Arts Project  80   1 20  10 
  001 Portfolio and presentation 80  1

3FA031   Audience and Engagement  74   1 20  10 
  001 Portfolio and presentation of research (equivalent to 5,000 words) 74  1

3FA041   Professional Exhibition and Presentation  69   1 20  10 
  001 Presentation of resolved artwork (equivalent to 3,500 words) 68  1
  002 Portfolio of supporting sketchbooks, documentation and contextual file (equivalent to 1,500 words) 72  1


2008/9

2CD010   Collaborative Practice  72   1 20  10 
  001 A report analysing the aims & outcomes of the collaboration & each individuals contribution to the work (2,500 words) 74  1
  002 A 20 min group presentation of the collaborative outcome/work in an appropriate format (equivalent to 2,500 words) 70  1

2CD020   Working in the Creative Industries  66   1 20  10 
  001 An essay on an aspect of the creative industries to be negotiated with the module director (2,500 words) 67  1
  002 A critical evaluative report on the process of finding the placement 65  1

2FA010   Inside the White Cube  62   1 20  10 
  001 Installation within the White Cube (equivalent to 2500 words) 64  1
  002 Portfolio of research / documentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 59  1

2FA020   Word Based Arts  71   1 20  10 
  001 Academic research (jounal and sketchbooks) into word-based fine art practices and image/word relationships 69  1
  002 Visual artefact(s) : performance, digital piece or installation (equivalent 2500 words) 72  1

2FA031   Intertextuality  63   1 20  10 
  001 Critical/analytical essay (equivalent to 2,500 words) 62  1
  002 Presentation (equivalent to 2,500 words) 63  1

2FA040   Outside the White Cube  71   1 20  10 
  001 Documentation of work outside the White Cube in alternative sites 68  1
  002 Research & development portfolio of work associated with the project (equivalent to 2500 words) 73  1


  Total credits gained 240 120  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class I
 
  Classification average:
 
69.06
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 
Student Representative
Represents the views of students within their cohort, liaising with the University
 
Student Union Councillor: Communications Officer
Responsible for administration connected to Hall of Residence, first point of contact for students
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Ggggggg
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Emily Rachel
1.3 Date of birth:
 
9 February 1988
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Performance
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The BA Performance (Hons) degree programme aims to:
  • Develop the students’ practical and theoretical interest, knowledge and understanding of established, new and emergent performance practices in the arts
  • Invite students to consider the political, social and cultural significance of performance making and spectating through the analysis of historical and contemporary practices by individual and/or groups of artists and the critics/analysts who have responded to, and perhaps influenced, their output
  • Encourage individuals and groups to creatively harness their intellectual skills and making skills to compose thoughtful, imaginative and articulate performance works for diverse audiences/spectators/participants and witnesses
  • Produce motivated graduates capable of contributing, individually or as collaborators, in the Creative Industries as well as employing their skills in a wide variety of presentational and interactive contexts
  • Inculcate the continued desirability and significance of embracing new learning opportunities.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3CA030   Theories and Contexts 5:Cultural Memory History & Identity  67   1 20  10 
  001 Essay of 1,500 words 62  1
  002 Project of 3,500 words 69  1

3CA040   Theories and Contexts 6:Independent Project  70   1 20  10 
  001 Dissertation between 5000 and 8000 words 70  1

3CA460   Acting for Theatre  58   1 20  10 
  001 Individually assessed performance presentation (within an ensemble context) - 5000 words equivalent 58  1

3CA491   Performance Practice 3: Live Art  72   1 20  10 
  001 Performance lecture (equivalent to 4000 words) 72  1
  002 Contextual document (2000 words 72  1

3CA500   Independent Theatre Companies Project  59   1 20  10 
  001 Performance (equivalent to 3750 words) 58  1
  002 Viva voce (equivalent to 1250 words) 60  1

3CA521   Performance Practice 4: Independent Performance Project  72   1 20  10 
  001 Performance (equivalent to 3000 words) 75  1
  002 Contextual Document 2000 words 68  1


2008/9

2CA040   Theories and Contexts 3:Identity and Difference  64   1 20  10 
  001 Reviews of two articles introduced on the module that consider identity and difference (equivalent to 2500 words) 64  1
  002 One essay of 2500 words 64  1

2CA050   Theories and Contexts 4:Power and the Production of Meaning  58   1 20  10 
  001 Group Seminar Presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 58  1
  002 One essay developing ideas from the presentation (2500 words) 58  1

2CA440   Theatre Production  72   1 20  10 
  001 Practical: Performance Production Process equivalent to 3000 words 75  1
  002 Performance equivalent to 1000 words 62  1
  003 Essay equivalent to 1000 words 71  1

2CA491   Performance Practice 2:Artist as Witness  69   1 20  10 
  001 Essay - 1500 - 2000 words 69  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 2500 words) 68  1

2CA500   Introduction to Directing Theatre  58   1 20  10 
  001 A 10-12 minute student directed performance extract (w actors from the Theatre Production model) (equiv to 3000 words) 56  1
  002 Directorial Journal: A 2000 word journal that articulates a specific directorial process from page to stage 60  1

2CA510   Theatre Research: Comedy  61   1 20  10 
  001 Seminar Presentation (equivalent to 2500 words). 53  1
  002 Essay - 2500 words 68  1


2007/8

1CA050   Theories and Contexts :An Introduction to Cultural Politics  66   1 20  10 
  001 Expanded glossary (1500 words or equivalent) to include definitions of key terms 64  1
  002 Portfolio (3500 words or equivalent) to include three critical accounts/ readings of cultural practices 68  1

1CA060   Theories and Contexts 2:Representation  62   1 20  10 
  001 One group presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 68  1
  002 One essay 2500 words that develops ideas put forward in the presentation 56  1

1CA440   Text Studies 1  72   1 10 
  001 An essay of 2500 words 72  1

1CA450   Acting workshop 1  64   1 10 
  001 Practical: Presentation of acting/rehearsal techniques (equivalent to 1250 words) 65  1
  002 Summative essay (Reflective Journal as appendix) of 1250 words 63  1

1CA460   Devising Studies 1  68   1 10 
  001 Essay (2500 words) 68  1

1CA471   Devising for Performance 1  73   1 10 
  001 Process based Assessment (equivalent to 1000 words) 74  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 1500 words) 72  1

1CA480   Text Studies 2  68   1 10 
  001 An essay of 2500 words 68  1

1CA490   Acting Workshop 2  60   1 10 
  001 Practical: Performance Presentations of acting techniques (50%)(equivalent of 1250 words) 63  1
  002 Reflective Journal on work issues raised in the module of 1250 words 56  1

1CA500   Devising Studies 2  72   1 10 
  001 Essay (2500 words) 72  1

1CA511   Devising for Performance 2  73   1 10 
  001 Process based assessment (equivalent to 1000 words) 78  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 1500 words) 70  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class II Division i
 
  Classification average:
 
65.44
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Hhhhhhhh
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Nikita
1.3 Date of birth:
 
26 September 1988
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Performance
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The BA Performance (Hons) degree programme aims to:
  • Develop the students’ practical and theoretical interest, knowledge and understanding of established, new and emergent performance practices in the arts
  • Invite students to consider the political, social and cultural significance of performance making and spectating through the analysis of historical and contemporary practices by individual and/or groups of artists and the critics/analysts who have responded to, and perhaps influenced, their output
  • Encourage individuals and groups to creatively harness their intellectual skills and making skills to compose thoughtful, imaginative and articulate performance works for diverse audiences/spectators/participants and witnesses
  • Produce motivated graduates capable of contributing, individually or as collaborators, in the Creative Industries as well as employing their skills in a wide variety of presentational and interactive contexts
  • Inculcate the continued desirability and significance of embracing new learning opportunities.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3CA030   Theories and Contexts 5:Cultural Memory History & Identity  65   1 20  10 
  001 Essay of 1,500 words 71  1
  002 Project of 3,500 words 62  1

3CA040   Theories and Contexts 6:Independent Project  72   1 20  10 
  001 Dissertation between 5000 and 8000 words 72  1

3CA470   Directing for Theatre  62   1 20  10 
  001 Practical: An individual contribution to the directing of a performance presentation - 5000 words equivalent 62  1

3CA491   Performance Practice 3: Live Art  67   1 20  10 
  001 Performance lecture (equivalent to 4000 words) 68  1
  002 Contextual document (2000 words 65  1

3CA500   Independent Theatre Companies Project  59   1 20  10 
  001 Performance (equivalent to 3750 words) 58  1
  002 Viva voce (equivalent to 1250 words) 61  1

3CA521   Performance Practice 4: Independent Performance Project  60   1 20  10 
  001 Performance (equivalent to 3000 words) 54  1
  002 Contextual Document 2000 words 68  1


2008/9

2CA040   Theories and Contexts 3:Identity and Difference  61   1 20  10 
  001 Reviews of two articles introduced on the module that consider identity and difference (equivalent to 2500 words) 61  1
  002 One essay of 2500 words 61  1

2CA050   Theories and Contexts 4:Power and the Production of Meaning  69   1 20  10 
  001 Group Seminar Presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 65  1
  002 One essay developing ideas from the presentation (2500 words) 72  1

2CA440   Theatre Production  65   1 20  10 
  001 Practical: Performance Production Process equivalent to 3000 words 67  1
  002 Performance equivalent to 1000 words 60  1
  003 Essay equivalent to 1000 words 63  1

2CA481   Performance Practice 1:The Performance of the Self  59   1 20  10 
  001 Contextual Document 2,500 words 62  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 2500 words) 55  1

2CA491   Performance Practice 2:Artist as Witness  64   1 20  10 
  001 Essay - 1500 - 2000 words 62  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 2500 words) 65  1

2CA500   Introduction to Directing Theatre  52   1 20  10 
  001 A 10-12 minute student directed performance extract (w actors from the Theatre Production model) (equiv to 3000 words) 52  1
  002 Directorial Journal: A 2000 word journal that articulates a specific directorial process from page to stage 52  1


2007/8

1CA050   Theories and Contexts :An Introduction to Cultural Politics  60   1 20  10 
  001 Expanded glossary (1500 words or equivalent) to include definitions of key terms 63  1
  002 Portfolio (3500 words or equivalent) to include three critical accounts/ readings of cultural practices 57  1

1CA060   Theories and Contexts 2:Representation  65   1 20  10 
  001 One group presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 65  1
  002 One essay 2500 words that develops ideas put forward in the presentation 64  1

1CA440   Text Studies 1  57   1 10 
  001 An essay of 2500 words 57  1

1CA450   Acting workshop 1  59   1 10 
  001 Practical: Presentation of acting/rehearsal techniques (equivalent to 1250 words) 61  1
  002 Summative essay (Reflective Journal as appendix) of 1250 words 56  1

1CA460   Devising Studies 1  61   1 10 
  001 Essay (2500 words) 61  1

1CA471   Devising for Performance 1  66   1 10 
  001 Process based Assessment (equivalent to 1000 words) 68  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 1500 words) 64  1

1CA480   Text Studies 2  60   1 10 
  001 An essay of 2500 words 60  1

1CA490   Acting Workshop 2  61   1 10 
  001 Practical: Performance Presentations of acting techniques (50%)(equivalent of 1250 words) 63  1
  002 Reflective Journal on work issues raised in the module of 1250 words 58  1

1CA500   Devising Studies 2  70   1 10 
  001 Essay (2500 words) 70  1

1CA511   Devising for Performance 2  61   1 10 
  001 Process based assessment (equivalent to 1000 words) 68  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 1500 words) 56  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class II Division i
 
  Classification average:
 
63.33
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 
Student Union Councillor: International Officer
Responsible for administration connected to Hall of Residence, first point of contact for students
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Iiiiiiiii
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Rachel Helen
1.3 Date of birth:
 
1 January 1988
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Business Management
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The Business Management degree programme aims to:
  • Develop critical and analytical understanding of business and management theory and practice
  • Foster the skills of research, analysis, interpretation, critical thinking and independent inquiry
  • Provide students with the opportunity to specialise in a particular aspect of business management for a named specialist award
  • Provide students with vocational competencies that meet the needs of students and employers
  • Facilitate personal development and the enhancement of skills in communication, team work, self management, organisation and problem solving
  • Provide students with relevant transferable skills, both conceptual and practical, to enable them to confidently address the demands of the workplace and the employment market
  • Enable students to develop progressively as autonomous independent learners and to foster intrinsic motivation towards the study of business management.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3BM020   Organisation Strategy and Decision Making  70   1 20  10 
  001 Analysis of a case study (2500 words) 72  1
  002 A test (2500 words equivalent) 67  1

3BM050   Business Environments in the Single European Market  74   1 20  10 
  001 An essay (2500 words) 72  1
  002 A critical review of the Single European Market (2500 words) 75  1

3BM070   Strategic Corporate Finance  72   1 20  10 
  001 Case study (2500 words) 69  1
  002 Numerical/Interpretive Workshop (2500 word equivalent) 75  1

3BM100   Managing a Diverse Workforce  67   1 20  10 
  001 Written assignment 3500 words 68  1
  002 Poster 1500 words 65  1

3BM991   Research Investigation (40 credit version with 3BM992)  79   1 20  10 
  001 An oral presentation (1250 word equivalent) 80  1
  002 A research paper in a style deemed acceptable for submission to a named peer reviewed journal, to meet (5000 words) 78  1

3BM992   Research Investigation (40 credit version with 3BM991)  79   1 20  10 
  001 An oral presentation (1250 word equivalent) 80  1
  002 A research paper in a style deemed acceptable for submission to a named peer reviewed journal, to meet (5000 words) 78  1


2008/9

2BM010   Financial Management  62   1 20  10 
  001 A test (2500 words equivalent) 58  1
  002 A case study (2500 words equivalent) 65  1

2BM030   Research Methods for Business  64   1 20  10 
  001 Test (2000 words equivalent) 69  1
  002 Research project (3000 words) 60  1

2BM040   Marketing Practice  60   1 20  10 
  001 Marketing report (3500 words) 57  1
  002 Oral presentation (1500 words equivalent) 67  1

2BM060   Organisational Human Resource Management  67   1 20  10 
  001 Written report (3000 words) 72  1
  002 Poster presentation (1500 word equivalent) 56  1

2BM100   International Trade and Globalisation  72   1 20  10 
  001 An essay (2500 words) 75  1
  002 A test (2500 words) 69  1

2BM110   A Career in Business  67   1 20  10 
  001 A critical review of the students' own performance in the area of job applications and interviews (1500 words) 67  1
  002 A report on the work based learning (3500 words) 67  1


2007/8

1BM010   Leadership and Management  54   1 20  10 
  001 An essay in which theories of leadership and management are explored and related to experience (2500 words) 62  1
  002 A learning portfolio the aims and objectives of which will be agreed individually in a learning conract (2500 words) 45  1

1BM020   ICT and Study Skills  74   1 20  10 
  001 A test (spreadsheets and statistics) 2500 words 75  1
  002 Oral presentation with an accompanying written summary (2500 word equivalent) 73  1

1BM030   Service Industries: Leisure and Tourism  62   1 20  10 
  001 An essay (2500 words) 54  1
  002 A poster presentation (2500 words equivalent) 70  1

1BM040   Economics and Finance  63   1 20  10 
  001 A report (2500 words equivalent) 74  1
  002 A test (2500 words equivalent) 52  1

1BM050   Managing People  72   1 20  10 
  001 A report 74  1
  002 Critical review 70  1

1BM060   Meeting Customer Needs  66   1 20  10 
  001 Oral presentation (2000 word equivalent) 58  1
  002 A written report (3000 words) 72  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class I
 
  Classification average:
 
70.78
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Jjjjjjjj
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Verity
1.3 Date of birth:
 
18 December 1988
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Performance
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The BA Performance (Hons) degree programme aims to:
  • Develop the students’ practical and theoretical interest, knowledge and understanding of established, new and emergent performance practices in the arts
  • Invite students to consider the political, social and cultural significance of performance making and spectating through the analysis of historical and contemporary practices by individual and/or groups of artists and the critics/analysts who have responded to, and perhaps influenced, their output
  • Encourage individuals and groups to creatively harness their intellectual skills and making skills to compose thoughtful, imaginative and articulate performance works for diverse audiences/spectators/participants and witnesses
  • Produce motivated graduates capable of contributing, individually or as collaborators, in the Creative Industries as well as employing their skills in a wide variety of presentational and interactive contexts
  • Inculcate the continued desirability and significance of embracing new learning opportunities.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3CA030   Theories and Contexts 5:Cultural Memory History & Identity  59   1 20  10 
  001 Essay of 1,500 words 60  1
  002 Project of 3,500 words 58  1

3CA040   Theories and Contexts 6:Independent Project  60   1 20  10 
  001 Dissertation between 5000 and 8000 words 60  1

3CA460   Acting for Theatre  65   1 20  10 
  001 Individually assessed performance presentation (within an ensemble context) - 5000 words equivalent 65  1

3CA481   Applied Practice 3:Participative Arts Practice  72   1 20  10 
  001 Seminar presentation (equivalent to 3000 words) 72  1
  002 Contextual document (2000 words) 72  1

3CA500   Independent Theatre Companies Project  66   1 20  10 
  001 Performance (equivalent to 3750 words) 68  1
  002 Viva voce (equivalent to 1250 words) 60  1

3CA511   Applied Practice 4 - Community Arts Independent Project  66   1 20  10 
  001 Community Performance 62  1
  002 Contextual Document of 2000 words 72  1


2008/9

2CA040   Theories and Contexts 3:Identity and Difference  60   1 20  10 
  001 Reviews of two articles introduced on the module that consider identity and difference (equivalent to 2500 words) 60  1
  002 One essay of 2500 words 60  1

2CA050   Theories and Contexts 4:Power and the Production of Meaning  59   1 20  10 
  001 Group Seminar Presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 67  1
  002 One essay developing ideas from the presentation (2500 words) 50  1

2CA440   Theatre Production  61   1 20  10 
  001 Practical: Performance Production Process equivalent to 3000 words 65  1
  002 Performance equivalent to 1000 words 54  1
  003 Essay equivalent to 1000 words 54  1

2CA460   Applied Practice 1: Schools Project  57   1 20  10 
  001 Performance (equivalent to 2500 words) 58  1
  002 Essay (2500 words) 55  1

2CA470   Applied Practice 2:Political Performance  59   1 20  10 
  001 Performance or workshop (equivalent to 2500 words) 58  1
  002 Reflective journal (equivalent to 2500 words) 60  1

2CA481   Performance Practice 1:The Performance of the Self  47   1 20  10 
  001 Contextual Document 2,500 words 52  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 2500 words) 41  1


2007/8

1CA050   Theories and Contexts :An Introduction to Cultural Politics  51   1 20  10 
  001 Expanded glossary (1500 words or equivalent) to include definitions of key terms 48  1
  002 Portfolio (3500 words or equivalent) to include three critical accounts/ readings of cultural practices 54  1

1CA060   Theories and Contexts 2:Representation  66   1 20  10 
  001 One group presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 67  1
  002 One essay 2500 words that develops ideas put forward in the presentation 64  1

1CA440   Text Studies 1  56   1 10 
  001 An essay of 2500 words 56  1

1CA450   Acting workshop 1  59   1 10 
  001 Practical: Presentation of acting/rehearsal techniques (equivalent to 1250 words) 58  1
  002 Summative essay (Reflective Journal as appendix) of 1250 words 59  1

1CA460   Devising Studies 1  50   1 10 
  001 Essay (2500 words) 50  1

1CA471   Devising for Performance 1  60   1 10 
  001 Process based Assessment (equivalent to 1000 words) 64  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 1500 words) 58  1

1CA480   Text Studies 2  59   1 10 
  001 An essay of 2500 words 59  1

1CA490   Acting Workshop 2  60   1 10 
  001 Practical: Performance Presentations of acting techniques (50%)(equivalent of 1250 words) 61  1
  002 Reflective Journal on work issues raised in the module of 1250 words 59  1

1CA500   Devising Studies 2  54   1 10 
  001 Essay (2500 words) 54  1

1CA511   Devising for Performance 2  61   1 10 
  001 Process based assessment (equivalent to 1000 words) 65  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 1500 words) 58  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class II Division i
 
  Classification average:
 
62.17
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 
Student Representative
Represents the views of students within their cohort, liaising with the University
 
Student Union Councillor: Entertainments Officer
Responsible for administration connected to Hall of Residence, first point of contact for students
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Kkkkkkkkkk
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Rebecca Margaret
1.3 Date of birth:
 
28 August 1989
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Business Management: Marketing
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The Business Management degree programme aims to:
  • Develop critical and analytical understanding of business and management theory and practice
  • Foster the skills of research, analysis, interpretation, critical thinking and independent inquiry
  • Provide students with the opportunity to specialise in a particular aspect of business management for a named specialist award
  • Provide students with vocational competencies that meet the needs of students and employers
  • Facilitate personal development and the enhancement of skills in communication, team work, self management, organisation and problem solving
  • Provide students with relevant transferable skills, both conceptual and practical, to enable them to confidently address the demands of the workplace and the employment market
  • Enable students to develop progressively as autonomous independent learners and to foster intrinsic motivation towards the study of business management.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3BM030   Tourism Policy and Planning  72   1 20  10 
  001 A report (3000 words) 76  1
  002 A test (2000 word equivalent) 66  1

3BM041   Leading and Managing Personal and Organisational Change  77   1 20  10 
  001 A critical review 3000 words 81  1
  002 Case study related to leadership (2000 words) 70  1

3BM060   International Marketing  76   1 20  10 
  001 Critical review (3000 words) 68  1
  002 Oral presentation (2000 word equivalent) 87  1

3BM100   Managing a Diverse Workforce  71   1 20  10 
  001 Written assignment 3500 words 72  1
  002 Poster 1500 words 70  1

3BM991   Research Investigation (40 credit version with 3BM992)  74   1 20  10 
  001 An oral presentation (1250 word equivalent) 78  1
  002 A research paper in a style deemed acceptable for submission to a named peer reviewed journal, to meet (5000 words) 72  1

3BM992   Research Investigation (40 credit version with 3BM991)  74   1 20  10 
  001 An oral presentation (1250 word equivalent) 78  1
  002 A research paper in a style deemed acceptable for submission to a named peer reviewed journal, to meet (5000 words) 72  1


2008/9

2BM010   Financial Management  72   1 20  10 
  001 A test (2500 words equivalent) 74  1
  002 A case study (2500 words equivalent) 69  1

2BM030   Research Methods for Business  67   1 20  10 
  001 Test (2000 words equivalent) 48  1
  002 Research project (3000 words) 80  1

2BM040   Marketing Practice  63   1 20  10 
  001 Marketing report (3500 words) 62  1
  002 Oral presentation (1500 words equivalent) 65  1

2BM060   Organisational Human Resource Management  61   1 20  10 
  001 Written report (3000 words) 55  1
  002 Poster presentation (1500 word equivalent) 75  1

2BM110   A Career in Business  70   1 20  10 
  001 A critical review of the students' own performance in the area of job applications and interviews (1500 words) 65  1
  002 A report on the work based learning (3500 words) 72  1

2BM130   Cultural and Heritage Tourism  72   1 20  10 
  001 An essay 2,000 words 78  1
  002 A critical analysis using both report and multimedia formats 3,500 words 68  1


2007/8

1BM010   Leadership and Management  52   1 20  10 
  001 An essay in which theories of leadership and management are explored and related to experience (2500 words) 45  1
  002 A learning portfolio the aims and objectives of which will be agreed individually in a learning conract (2500 words) 58  1

1BM020   ICT and Study Skills  69   1 20  10 
  001 A test (spreadsheets and statistics) 2500 words 65  1
  002 Oral presentation with an accompanying written summary (2500 word equivalent) 72  1

1BM030   Service Industries: Leisure and Tourism  64   1 20  10 
  001 An essay (2500 words) 64  1
  002 A poster presentation (2500 words equivalent) 63  1

1BM040   Economics and Finance  51   1 20  10 
  001 A report (2500 words equivalent) 61  1
  002 A test (2500 words equivalent) 0  1
  002 A test (2500 words equivalent) (deferred or re-assessment) 40  1

1BM050   Managing People  54   1 20  10 
  001 A report 48  1
  002 Critical review 60  1

1BM060   Meeting Customer Needs  68   1 20  10 
  001 Oral presentation (2000 word equivalent) 70  1
  002 A written report (3000 words) 66  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class I
 
  Classification average:
 
71.83
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Llllllllll
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Natasha
1.3 Date of birth:
 
29 July 1989
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Business Management
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The Business Management degree programme aims to:
  • Develop critical and analytical understanding of business and management theory and practice
  • Foster the skills of research, analysis, interpretation, critical thinking and independent inquiry
  • Provide students with the opportunity to specialise in a particular aspect of business management for a named specialist award
  • Provide students with vocational competencies that meet the needs of students and employers
  • Facilitate personal development and the enhancement of skills in communication, team work, self management, organisation and problem solving
  • Provide students with relevant transferable skills, both conceptual and practical, to enable them to confidently address the demands of the workplace and the employment market
  • Enable students to develop progressively as autonomous independent learners and to foster intrinsic motivation towards the study of business management.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3BM030   Tourism Policy and Planning  58   1 20  10 
  001 A report (3000 words) 54  1
  002 A test (2000 word equivalent) 65  1

3BM041   Leading and Managing Personal and Organisational Change  66   1 20  10 
  001 A critical review 3000 words 65  1
  002 Case study related to leadership (2000 words) 68  1

3BM070   Strategic Corporate Finance  59   1 20  10 
  001 Case study (2500 words) 64  1
  002 Numerical/Interpretive Workshop (2500 word equivalent) 54  1

3BM100   Managing a Diverse Workforce  64   1 20  10 
  001 Written assignment 3500 words 70  1
  002 Poster 1500 words 50  1

3BM991   Research Investigation (40 credit version with 3BM992)  66   1 20  10 
  001 An oral presentation (1250 word equivalent) 76  1
  002 A research paper in a style deemed acceptable for submission to a named peer reviewed journal, to meet (5000 words) 63  1

3BM992   Research Investigation (40 credit version with 3BM991)  66   1 20  10 
  001 An oral presentation (1250 word equivalent) 76  1
  002 A research paper in a style deemed acceptable for submission to a named peer reviewed journal, to meet (5000 words) 63  1


2008/9

2BM010   Financial Management  60   1 20  10 
  001 A test (2500 words equivalent) 52  1
  002 A case study (2500 words equivalent) 68  1

2BM020   Green Business  51   1 20  10 
  001 A numerical/interpretative workshop (2500 words equivalent) 50  1
  002 A critical review of a relevant journal article (2500 words) 52  1

2BM030   Research Methods for Business  64   1 20  10 
  001 Test (2000 words equivalent) 75  1
  002 Research project (3000 words) 56  1

2BM040   Marketing Practice  57   1 20  10 
  001 Marketing report (3500 words) 54  1
  002 Oral presentation (1500 words equivalent) 64  1

2BM070   Strategic and Operational Human Resource Management  57   1 20  10 
  001 Portfolio (3500 words equivalent) 50  1
  002 Oral presentation (2000 word equivalent) 68  1

2BM110   A Career in Business  60   1 20  10 
  001 A critical review of the students' own performance in the area of job applications and interviews (1500 words) 65  1
  002 A report on the work based learning (3500 words) 58  1


2007/8

1BM010   Leadership and Management  49   1 20  10 
  001 An essay in which theories of leadership and management are explored and related to experience (2500 words) 40  1
  002 A learning portfolio the aims and objectives of which will be agreed individually in a learning conract (2500 words) 58  1

1BM020   ICT and Study Skills  62   1 20  10 
  001 A test (spreadsheets and statistics) 2500 words 57  1
  002 Oral presentation with an accompanying written summary (2500 word equivalent) 66  1

1BM030   Service Industries: Leisure and Tourism  59   1 20  10 
  001 An essay (2500 words) 56  1
  002 A poster presentation (2500 words equivalent) 62  1

1BM040   Economics and Finance  54   1 20  10 
  001 A report (2500 words equivalent) 48  1
  002 A test (2500 words equivalent) 59  1

1BM050   Managing People  57   1 20  10 
  001 A report 55  1
  002 Critical review 58  1

1BM060   Meeting Customer Needs  57   1 20  10 
  001 Oral presentation (2000 word equivalent) 62  1
  002 A written report (3000 words) 54  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class II Division i
 
  Classification average:
 
61.5
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 
Student Union Councillor: Ethics and Environment Officer
Responsible for administration connected to Hall of Residence, first point of contact for students
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Mmmmmmmmm
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Elizabeth
1.3 Date of birth:
 
15 February 1988
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Performance
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The BA Performance (Hons) degree programme aims to:
  • Develop the students’ practical and theoretical interest, knowledge and understanding of established, new and emergent performance practices in the arts
  • Invite students to consider the political, social and cultural significance of performance making and spectating through the analysis of historical and contemporary practices by individual and/or groups of artists and the critics/analysts who have responded to, and perhaps influenced, their output
  • Encourage individuals and groups to creatively harness their intellectual skills and making skills to compose thoughtful, imaginative and articulate performance works for diverse audiences/spectators/participants and witnesses
  • Produce motivated graduates capable of contributing, individually or as collaborators, in the Creative Industries as well as employing their skills in a wide variety of presentational and interactive contexts
  • Inculcate the continued desirability and significance of embracing new learning opportunities.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3CA030   Theories and Contexts 5:Cultural Memory History & Identity  60   1 20  10 
  001 Essay of 1,500 words 56  1
  002 Project of 3,500 words 62  1

3CA040   Theories and Contexts 6:Independent Project  70   1 20  10 
  001 Dissertation between 5000 and 8000 words 70  1

3CA641   Music Musicians Audience  61   1 10 
  001 Group Presentation 55  1
  002 Critical report 66  1

3CA650   Music: Experimental Performance  66   1 10 
  001 Performance 66  1

3CA660   Music: Ensemble Performance 3  68   1 10 
  001 Contribution to performance (including rehearsals) 67  1
  002 Learning journal (750 words) 70  1

3CA670   Music: Ensemble Performance 4  74   1 10 
  001 Contribution to performance (including rehearsals) 75  1
  002 Learning journal (750 words) 69  1

3CA680   Music: Solo Performance 3  64   1 10 
  001 Presentation of solo instrumental/vocal performance 64  1

3CA690   Music: Solo Performance 4  68   1 10 
  001 Presentation of solo instrumental/vocal performance 68  1

3CA720   Contemporary Music  60   1 20  10 
  001 Essay of 2,500 words on a subject agreed with the tutor 61  1
  002 Group Practical Project. 58  1


2008/9

2CA040   Theories and Contexts 3:Identity and Difference  59   1 20  10 
  001 Reviews of two articles introduced on the module that consider identity and difference (equivalent to 2500 words) 58  1
  002 One essay of 2500 words 59  1

2CA050   Theories and Contexts 4:Power and the Production of Meaning  55   1 20  10 
  001 Group Seminar Presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 50  1
  002 One essay developing ideas from the presentation (2500 words) 59  1

2CA641   World Music  58   1 20  10 
  001 Essay on an agreed aspect of World Music 52  1
  002 Transcription (equivalent to 1250 words) 63  1
  003 Presentation of a research proposal 64  1

2CA660   Music: Ensemble Performance 1  60   1 10 
  001 Contribution to performance (equivalent to 1875 words) 65  1
  002 Learning journal (625 words) 43  1

2CA670   Music: Ensemble Performance 2  61   1 10 
  001 Contribution to performance (including rehearsals equivalent to 1750 words) 64  1
  002 Learning journal (750 words) 53  1

2CA680   Music: Solo Performance 1  58   1 10 
  001 Presentation of solo instrumental/vocal performance. (equivalent to 2500 words) 58  1

2CA690   Music: Solo Performance 2  71   1 10 
  001 Presentation of solo instrumental/vocal performance. (Equivalent to 2500 words) 71  1

2CA720   Music in the Community  63   1 20  10 
  001 Essay on an agreed aspect of music in the community (2000 words) 60  1
  002 Workshop devised for a particular community group 62  1
  003 Evaluation of placement through oral / visual presentation 70  1


2007/8

1CA632   Music Foundation  57   1 20  10 
  001 Critical study of specific musical texts - 2000 words 48  1
  002 Individual &/or group performance presentation (equivalent to 1500 words) 61  1
  003 Folio of compositions (equivalent to 1500 words) 62  1

1CA641   Music - Text  60   1 20  10 
  001 Critical written analysis of specific musical texts (1800 words) 63  1
  002 Individual and/or Group Performance (6-8 minutes). (equivalent to 2000 words) 60  1
  003 Analytical portfolio. (equivalent to 1500 words) 56  1

1CA662   Vox  57   1 20  10 
  001 Written analysis comparing a variety of vocal performances (2000 words) 52  1
  002 Group Performance(s) including some solo work (10-15 minutes). (equivalent to 3000 words) 61  1

1ED010   Current Issues in Education  54   1 20  10 
  001 An assignment in which one aspect of educational policy is critically examined - 2000 words 58  1
  002 A report structured in sections comparing and contrasting - 2000 words 50  1

1ED030   Ways of Thinking About Education  40   2 20  10 
  001 Essay on the different meanings of the concept of Education 49  1
  002 An essay identifying and analysing the main elements of educational ideologies 30  1
  002 An essay identifying and analysing the main elements of educational ideologies (deferred or re-assessment) 40  2

1MF030   British Sign Language Beginners  71   1 20  10 
  001 A Learning Portfolio (3000 words equivalent) including individual video evidence as the semester progresses 70  1
  002 Practical examination (2000 words equivalent) showing competence equivalent to British Sign Language Level 1 72  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class II Division i
 
  Classification average:
 
63.39
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Nnnnnnnnnn
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Daniel Robert
1.3 Date of birth:
 
12 May 1987
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
01234569789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Business Management
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
University of Leeds
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The Business Management degree programme aims to:
  • Develop critical and analytical understanding of business and management theory and practice
  • Foster the skills of research, analysis, interpretation, critical thinking and independent inquiry
  • Provide students with the opportunity to specialise in a particular aspect of business management for a named specialist award
  • Provide students with vocational competencies that meet the needs of students and employers
  • Facilitate personal development and the enhancement of skills in communication, team work, self management, organisation and problem solving
  • Provide students with relevant transferable skills, both conceptual and practical, to enable them to confidently address the demands of the workplace and the employment market
  • Enable students to develop progressively as autonomous independent learners and to foster intrinsic motivation towards the study of business management.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3BM020   Organisation Strategy and Decision Making  46   1 20  10 
  001 Analysis of a case study (2500 words) 40  1
  002 A test (2500 words equivalent) 51  1

3BM050   Business Environments in the Single European Market  60   1 20  10 
  001 An essay (2500 words) 64  1
  002 A critical review of the Single European Market (2500 words) 55  1

3BM070   Strategic Corporate Finance  64   1 20  10 
  001 Case study (2500 words) 59  1
  002 Numerical/Interpretive Workshop (2500 word equivalent) 68  1

3BM100   Managing a Diverse Workforce  59   1 20  10 
  001 Written assignment 3500 words 58  1
  002 Poster 1500 words 62  1

3BM991   Research Investigation (40 credit version with 3BM992)  44   1 20  10 
  001 An oral presentation (1250 word equivalent) 55  1
  002 A research paper in a style deemed acceptable for submission to a named peer reviewed journal, to meet (5000 words) 40  1

3BM992   Research Investigation (40 credit version with 3BM991)  43   1 20  10 
  001 An oral presentation (1250 word equivalent) 52  1
  002 A research paper in a style deemed acceptable for submission to a named peer reviewed journal, to meet (5000 words) 40  1


2008/9

2BM010   Financial Management  40   3 20  10 
  001 A test (2500 words equivalent) 65  1
  002 A case study (2500 words equivalent) 0  1
  002 A case study (2500 words equivalent) (deferred or re-assessment) 0  2
  002 A case study (2500 words equivalent) (deferred or re-assessment) 32  3

2BM030   Research Methods for Business  40   3 20  10 
  001 Test (2000 words equivalent) 40  1
  002 Research project (3000 words) 0  1
  002 Research project (3000 words) (deferred or re-assessment) 0  2
  002 Research project (3000 words) (deferred or re-assessment) 48  3

2BM040   Marketing Practice  40   3 20  10 
  001 Marketing report (3500 words) 0  1
  002 Oral presentation (1500 words equivalent) 46  1
  001 Marketing report (3500 words) (deferred or re-assessment) 18  2
  001 Marketing report (3500 words) (deferred or re-assessment) 54  3

2BM100   International Trade and Globalisation  40   2 20  10 
  001 An essay (2500 words) 40  1
  002 A test (2500 words) 29  1
  002 A test (2500 words) (deferred or re-assessment) 40  2

2BM110   A Career in Business  51   1 20  10 
  001 A critical review of the students' own performance in the area of job applications and interviews (1500 words) 50  1
  002 A report on the work based learning (3500 words) 51  1

2IT030   Computer Programming  40   2 20  10 
  001 A written design of a usable software application (2000 words) 41  1
  002 Individual project to design & produce a program (3000 word equivalent) 0  1
  002 Individual project to design & produce a program (3000 word equivalent) (deferred or re-assessment) 55  2


2007/8

2BM010   Financial Management  33   1
  001 A test (2500 words equivalent) 65  1
  002 A case study (2500 words equivalent) 0  1

2BM030   Research Methods for Business  16   1
  001 Test (2000 words equivalent) 40  1
  002 Research project (3000 words) 0  1

2BM040   Marketing Practice  14   1
  001 Marketing report (3500 words) 0  1
  002 Oral presentation (1500 words equivalent) 46  1


2006/7

1BM010   Leadership and Management  51   1 20  10 
  001 An essay in which theories of leadership and management are explored and related to experience (2500 words) 48  1
  002 A learning portfolio the aims and objectives of which will be agreed individually in a learning conract (2500 words) 54  1

1BM040   Economics and Finance  42   1 20  10 
  001 A numerical/interpretive workshop (2500 words equivalent) 41  1
  002 A test (2500 words equivalent) 43  1

1BM060   Meeting Customer Needs  50   1 20  10 
  001 Oral presentation (2000 word equivalent) 43  1
  002 A written report (3000 words) 55  1

1SX010   Research Methods and Study Skills in Sport and Exercise  49   1 20  10 
  001 Short answer / multiple choice test ( 1000 word equivalent) 0  1
  002 Short answer / multiple choice test ( 1000 word equivalent) 67  1
  003 Short answer / multiple choice test ( 1000 word equivalent) 52  1
  004 A computer-based data analysis and display exercise in the form of a small group presentation (2000 words) 62  1

1SX020   Introduction to the Study of Sport  44   1 20  10 
  001 A self study workbook 3000 words 50  1
  002 Essay 31  1

1SX030   Sport Sociology 1  40   2 20  10 
  001 Essay 0  1
  001 Essay (deferred or re-assessment) 40  2


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class II Division ii
 
  Classification average:
 
49.06
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 
Student Union Councillor: Equality and Diversity Officer
Responsible for administration connected to Hall of Residence, first point of contact for students
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Oooooooo
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Sarah
1.3 Date of birth:
 
4 July 1989
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Performance
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The BA Performance (Hons) degree programme aims to:
  • Develop the students’ practical and theoretical interest, knowledge and understanding of established, new and emergent performance practices in the arts
  • Invite students to consider the political, social and cultural significance of performance making and spectating through the analysis of historical and contemporary practices by individual and/or groups of artists and the critics/analysts who have responded to, and perhaps influenced, their output
  • Encourage individuals and groups to creatively harness their intellectual skills and making skills to compose thoughtful, imaginative and articulate performance works for diverse audiences/spectators/participants and witnesses
  • Produce motivated graduates capable of contributing, individually or as collaborators, in the Creative Industries as well as employing their skills in a wide variety of presentational and interactive contexts
  • Inculcate the continued desirability and significance of embracing new learning opportunities.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3CA030   Theories and Contexts 5:Cultural Memory History & Identity  56   1 20  10 
  001 Essay of 1,500 words 55  1
  002 Project of 3,500 words 57  1

3CA040   Theories and Contexts 6:Independent Project  67   1 20  10 
  001 Dissertation between 5000 and 8000 words 0  1
  001 Dissertation between 5000 and 8000 words (deferred or re-assessment) 67  1

3CA641   Music Musicians Audience  61   1 10 
  001 Group Presentation 60  1
  002 Critical report 62  1

3CA650   Music: Experimental Performance  64   1 10 
  001 Performance 64  1

3CA660   Music: Ensemble Performance 3  63   1 10 
  001 Contribution to performance (including rehearsals) 61  1
  002 Learning journal (750 words) 68  1

3CA670   Music: Ensemble Performance 4  75   1 10 
  001 Contribution to performance (including rehearsals) 77  1
  002 Learning journal (750 words) 69  1

3CA680   Music: Solo Performance 3  80   1 10 
  001 Presentation of solo instrumental/vocal performance 80  1

3CA690   Music: Solo Performance 4  78   1 10 
  001 Presentation of solo instrumental/vocal performance 78  1

3CA720   Contemporary Music  68   1 20  10 
  001 Essay of 2,500 words on a subject agreed with the tutor 66  1
  002 Group Practical Project. 70  1


2008/9

2CA040   Theories and Contexts 3:Identity and Difference  60   1 20  10 
  001 Reviews of two articles introduced on the module that consider identity and difference (equivalent to 2500 words) 59  1
  002 One essay of 2500 words 60  1

2CA050   Theories and Contexts 4:Power and the Production of Meaning  57   1 20  10 
  001 Group Seminar Presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 60  1
  002 One essay developing ideas from the presentation (2500 words) 54  1

2CA641   World Music  64   1 20  10 
  001 Essay on an agreed aspect of World Music 62  1
  002 Transcription (equivalent to 1250 words) 66  1
  003 Presentation of a research proposal 65  1

2CA660   Music: Ensemble Performance 1  71   1 10 
  001 Contribution to performance (equivalent to 1875 words) 75  1
  002 Learning journal (625 words) 58  1

2CA670   Music: Ensemble Performance 2  71   1 10 
  001 Contribution to performance (including rehearsals equivalent to 1750 words) 75  1
  002 Learning journal (750 words) 63  1

2CA680   Music: Solo Performance 1  73   1 10 
  001 Presentation of solo instrumental/vocal performance. (equivalent to 2500 words) 73  1

2CA690   Music: Solo Performance 2  74   1 10 
  001 Presentation of solo instrumental/vocal performance. (Equivalent to 2500 words) 74  1

2CA720   Music in the Community  63   1 20  10 
  001 Essay on an agreed aspect of music in the community (2000 words) 68  1
  002 Workshop devised for a particular community group 58  1
  003 Evaluation of placement through oral / visual presentation 65  1


2007/8

1CA050   Theories and Contexts :An Introduction to Cultural Politics  68   1 20  10 
  001 Expanded glossary (1500 words or equivalent) to include definitions of key terms 68  1
  002 Portfolio (3500 words or equivalent) to include three critical accounts/ readings of cultural practices 68  1

1CA060   Theories and Contexts 2:Representation  59   1 20  10 
  001 One group presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 60  1
  002 One essay 2500 words that develops ideas put forward in the presentation 58  1

1CA632   Music Foundation  70   1 20  10 
  001 Critical study of specific musical texts - 2000 words 72  1
  002 Individual &/or group performance presentation (equivalent to 1500 words) 63  1
  003 Folio of compositions (equivalent to 1500 words) 76  1

1CA641   Music - Text  73   1 20  10 
  001 Critical written analysis of specific musical texts (1800 words) 75  1
  002 Individual and/or Group Performance (6-8 minutes). (equivalent to 2000 words) 76  1
  003 Analytical portfolio. (equivalent to 1500 words) 68  1

1CA651   Music Devised  62   1 20  10 
  001 Portfolio of Compositions (20 minutes) (equivalent to 2500 words) 61  1
  002 Individual and/or Group Improvisation (7-10 minutes) (equivalent to 1250 words) 71  1
  003 Critical Journal. (equivalent to 1250 words) 55  1

1CA662   Vox  69   1 20  10 
  001 Written analysis comparing a variety of vocal performances (2000 words) 64  1
  002 Group Performance(s) including some solo work (10-15 minutes). (equivalent to 3000 words) 72  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class II Division i
 
  Classification average:
 
66.19
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 
Student Representative
Represents the views of students within their cohort, liaising with the University
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
10 September 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Ppppppppp
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Steven
1.3 Date of birth:
 
6 February 1989
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Business Management: Marketing
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The Business Management degree programme aims to:
  • Develop critical and analytical understanding of business and management theory and practice
  • Foster the skills of research, analysis, interpretation, critical thinking and independent inquiry
  • Provide students with the opportunity to specialise in a particular aspect of business management for a named specialist award
  • Provide students with vocational competencies that meet the needs of students and employers
  • Facilitate personal development and the enhancement of skills in communication, team work, self management, organisation and problem solving
  • Provide students with relevant transferable skills, both conceptual and practical, to enable them to confidently address the demands of the workplace and the employment market
  • Enable students to develop progressively as autonomous independent learners and to foster intrinsic motivation towards the study of business management.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3BM020   Organisation Strategy and Decision Making  50   1 20  10 
  001 Analysis of a case study (2500 words) 56  1
  002 A test (2500 words equivalent) 44  1

3BM050   Business Environments in the Single European Market  72   1 20  10 
  001 An essay (2500 words) 75  1
  002 A critical review of the Single European Market (2500 words) 69  1

3BM060   International Marketing  59   1 20  10 
  001 Critical review (3000 words) 60  1
  002 Oral presentation (2000 word equivalent) 57  1

3BM100   Managing a Diverse Workforce  57   1 20  10 
  001 Written assignment 3500 words 57  1
  002 Poster 1500 words 58  1

3BM991   Research Investigation (40 credit version with 3BM992)  54   1 20  10 
  001 An oral presentation (1250 word equivalent) 53  1
  002 A research paper in a style deemed acceptable for submission to a named peer reviewed journal, to meet (5000 words) 54  1

3BM992   Research Investigation (40 credit version with 3BM991)  54   1 20  10 
  001 An oral presentation (1250 word equivalent) 53  1
  002 A research paper in a style deemed acceptable for submission to a named peer reviewed journal, to meet (5000 words) 54  1


2008/9

2BM020   Green Business  66   1 20  10 
  001 A numerical/interpretative workshop (2500 words equivalent) 65  1
  002 A critical review of a relevant journal article (2500 words) 66  1

2BM030   Research Methods for Business  61   1 20  10 
  001 Test (2000 words equivalent) 65  1
  002 Research project (3000 words) 58  1

2BM040   Marketing Practice  55   1 20  10 
  001 Marketing report (3500 words) 56  1
  002 Oral presentation (1500 words equivalent) 53  1

2BM100   International Trade and Globalisation  53   1 20  10 
  001 An essay (2500 words) 65  1
  002 A test (2500 words) 41  1

2BM110   A Career in Business  65   1 20  10 
  001 A critical review of the students' own performance in the area of job applications and interviews (1500 words) 65  1
  002 A report on the work based learning (3500 words) 65  1

2BM120   Financial Reporting and Analysis  51   1 20  10 
  001 A test (2500 words equivalent) 48  1
  002 A case study 53  1


2007/8

1BM010   Leadership and Management  52   1 20  10 
  001 An essay in which theories of leadership and management are explored and related to experience (2500 words) 56  1
  002 A learning portfolio the aims and objectives of which will be agreed individually in a learning conract (2500 words) 48  1

1BM020   ICT and Study Skills  60   1 20  10 
  001 A test (spreadsheets and statistics) 2500 words 69  1
  002 Oral presentation with an accompanying written summary (2500 word equivalent) 50  1

1BM030   Service Industries: Leisure and Tourism  52   1 20  10 
  001 An essay (2500 words) 54  1
  002 A poster presentation (2500 words equivalent) 50  1

1BM040   Economics and Finance  60   1 20  10 
  001 A report (2500 words equivalent) 62  1
  002 A test (2500 words equivalent) 57  1

1BM050   Managing People  60   1 20  10 
  001 A report 67  1
  002 Critical review 52  1

1BM060   Meeting Customer Needs  56   1 20  10 
  001 Oral presentation (2000 word equivalent) 55  1
  002 A written report (3000 words) 56  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class II Division ii
 
  Classification average:
 
58.08
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 
Student Warden
Responsible for administration connected to Hall of Residence, first point of contact for students
 
Student Union Councillor: Sports and Societies Officer
Responsible for administration connected to Hall of Residence, first point of contact for students
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution. Teaching to prepare students for the award of higher education qualifications can be conducted in any higher education institution or further education college.

Degree awarding powers and the title ‘university’

All the universities and many of the higher education colleges have legal power to develop their own courses and award their own degrees, and determine the conditions on which they are awarded: some HE colleges and specialist institutions without these powers offer programmes, with varying extents of devolved authority, leading to the degrees of an institution which does have them. All universities in existence before 2005 have the power to award degrees on the basis of completion of taught courses and the power to award research degrees. From 2005, institutions in England and Wales that award only taught degrees (‘first’ and ‘second cycle’) and which meet certain numerical criteria, may also be permitted to use the title ‘university’. Higher education institutions that award only taught degrees but which do not meet the numerical criteria may apply to use the title ‘university college’, although not all choose to do so.

All of these institutions are subject to the same regulatory quality assurance and funding requirements as universities; and all institutions decide for themselves which students to admit and which staff to appoint.

Degrees and other higher education qualifications are legally owned by the awarding institution, not by the state.

The names of institutions with their own degree awarding powers (“Recognised Bodies”) are set out at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm Institutions able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body (“Listed Bodies”) are listed by the English, Welsh and Northern Irish authorities. The list may be found at: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/index.cfm

Qualifications

The types of qualifications awarded by higher education institutions at sub-degree and undergraduate (first cycle) and postgraduate level (second and third cycles) are described in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ), including qualifications descriptors, developed with the sector by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA - established in 1997 as an independent UK-wide body to monitor the standard of higher education provision - www.qaa.ac.uk). The


Footnote
(1) The UK has a system of devolved government, including for higher education, to Scotland, to Wales and to Northern Ireland. This description is approved by the High Level Policy Forum which includes representatives of the then Department for Education and Skills (DfES) now the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. (DIUS), Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government, the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Wales and the Scottish Funding Council, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA), Universities UK (UUK), the Standing Conference of Principals (now GuildHE) and the National Recognition Information Centre for the UK (UK NARIC).

  Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), the Qualifications Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales (ACCAC) and the Council for Curriculum Examination and Assessment, (Northern Ireland) (CCEA) have established the National Qualifications Framework, which is aligned with the FHEQ with typical credit values. These authorities regulate a number of professional, statutory and other awarding bodies which control qualifications at HE and other levels.

Foundation degrees, designed to create intermediate awards strongly oriented towards specific employment opportunities, were introduced in 2001 and are available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In terms of the European HE Area they are “short cycle” qualifications within the first cycle.

Quality assurance

Academic standards are established and maintained by higher education institutions themselves using an extensive and sophisticated range of shared quality assurance approaches and structures. Standards and quality in institutions are underpinned by universal use of external examiners, a standard set of indicators and other reports and by the activities of the QAA and in professional areas by relevant Professional and Statutory Bodies. This ensures that institutions meet national expectations described in the FHEQ: subject benchmark (character) statements, the Code of Practice and a system of programme specifications. QAA conducts peer-review based audits and reviews of higher education institutions with the opportunity for subject-based review as the need arises. Accuracy and adequacy of quality-related information published by the higher education institutions is also reviewed. QAA reviews also cover higher education programmes taught in further education institutions.

Credit systems

There is a national credit system in place in Wales which embraces all post-16 education. Around 75% of institutions in England and Northern Ireland (around 85% of students) belong to credit systems consortia. There are local credit systems in some other institutions. QCA is developing a system intended for further education in England, the Framework for Achievement, designed to articulate with higher education. Many institutions use credit points for students transferring between programmes or institutions, and use ECTS for transfers within the European area and to recognise learning gained by students on exchange visits with institutions elsewhere in Europe.

Admission

The most common qualification for entry to higher education is the General Certificate of Education at ‘Advanced’ (A)-level (including the “advanced supplementary”). Other qualifications for entry are the Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education, the kite-marked Access Certificate or other qualifications located in the National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 3 Advanced, or the equivalent according to the Credit and Qualifications Framework in Wales, including the Welsh Baccalaureate and qualifications in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework. A-levels are normally taken by students in their 13th year of school or at a college of further education and comprise up to three or four specialist subjects studied in considerable depth, involving coursework and final examinations. Part-time and mature students may enter with these qualifications or alternatives with evidenced equivalent prior learning and experience. Institutions will admit students whom they believe to have the potential to complete their programmes successfully, and set their requirements for entry to particular programmes accordingly.

Higher Education Achievement Report



 
  HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
(Diploma Supplement)
 
  This Higher Education Achievement Report incorporates the model developed by the European Commission, Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES for the Diploma Supplement.

The purpose of the supplement is to provide sufficient recognition of qualifications (diplomas, degrees, certificates etc.). It is designed to provide a description of the nature, level, context and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the individual named on the original qualifications to which this supplement is appended. It should be free from any value judgements, equivalence statements or suggestions about recognition. Information in all eight sections should be provided. Where information is not provided, an explanation should give the reason why.

In hard copy format this higher education achievement report is printed in black ink on paper watermarked with the crest of the university and carries the official university stamp. It is not valid unless in this format.
 

1 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE HOLDER OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
1.1 Family name(s):
 
Qqqqqqqqq
1.2 Given name(s):
 
Verity Melissa
1.3 Date of birth:
 
11 July 1989
1.4 Student identification number or code:
 
0123456789
  HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency, UK, the unique national identifying number for students registered at a UK university.
 

2 INFORMATION IDENTIFYING THE QUALIFICATION
 
2.1 Name of qualification: YSJ BA (Hons)
 
  The power to award degrees is regulated by law in the UK
 
2.2 Main fields of study: Performance
 
2.3 Name and status of awarding institution:
 
York St John University
 
2.4 Name and status of institution (if different from 2.3) administering studies:
 
  York St John University, a recognised body with taught degree awarding powers and an accredited college of the University of Leeds
 
2.5 Language of instruction/ examination:
 
English
 

3 INFORMATION ON THE LEVEL OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
3.1 Level of qualification:
 
  UK Bachelors Degree: with honours level 6; European HEA 1st cycle degree
 
3.2 Official length of programme: 3 years
 
3.3 Access requirements:
 
  Detailed information regarding admission to the programme is available in the University's on-line Prospectus at: www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

4 INFORMATION ON THE CONTENTS AND RESULTS GAINED
 
4.1 Mode of study:
 
Full time
 
4.2 Programme requirements:
 
  Normally 360 credits including 120 at Level 3. See Programme specification and Regulations at www.yorksj.ac.uk.
 
4.3 Programme details:
 
  The BA Performance (Hons) degree programme aims to:
  • Develop the students’ practical and theoretical interest, knowledge and understanding of established, new and emergent performance practices in the arts
  • Invite students to consider the political, social and cultural significance of performance making and spectating through the analysis of historical and contemporary practices by individual and/or groups of artists and the critics/analysts who have responded to, and perhaps influenced, their output
  • Encourage individuals and groups to creatively harness their intellectual skills and making skills to compose thoughtful, imaginative and articulate performance works for diverse audiences/spectators/participants and witnesses
  • Produce motivated graduates capable of contributing, individually or as collaborators, in the Creative Industries as well as employing their skills in a wide variety of presentational and interactive contexts
  • Inculcate the continued desirability and significance of embracing new learning opportunities.
   
Individual marks and credits obtained:
Mark Attempt Credits ECTS
Gained
2009/0

3CA030   Theories and Contexts 5:Cultural Memory History & Identity  64   1 20  10 
  001 Essay of 1,500 words 61  1
  002 Project of 3,500 words 65  1

3CA040   Theories and Contexts 6:Independent Project  58   1 20  10 
  001 Dissertation between 5000 and 8000 words 58  1

3CA460   Acting for Theatre  68   1 20  10 
  001 Individually assessed performance presentation (within an ensemble context) - 5000 words equivalent 68  1

3CA491   Performance Practice 3: Live Art  60   1 20  10 
  001 Performance lecture (equivalent to 4000 words) 63  1
  002 Contextual document (2000 words 55  1

3CA500   Independent Theatre Companies Project  57   1 20  10 
  001 Performance (equivalent to 3750 words) 58  1
  002 Viva voce (equivalent to 1250 words) 55  1

3CA521   Performance Practice 4: Independent Performance Project  59   1 20  10 
  001 Performance (equivalent to 3000 words) 53  1
  002 Contextual Document 2000 words 68  1


2008/9

2CA040   Theories and Contexts 3:Identity and Difference  62   1 20  10 
  001 Reviews of two articles introduced on the module that consider identity and difference (equivalent to 2500 words) 60  1
  002 One essay of 2500 words 63  1

2CA050   Theories and Contexts 4:Power and the Production of Meaning  61   1 20  10 
  001 Group Seminar Presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 55  1
  002 One essay developing ideas from the presentation (2500 words) 67  1

2CA440   Theatre Production  68   1 20  10 
  001 Practical: Performance Production Process equivalent to 3000 words 66  1
  002 Performance equivalent to 1000 words 73  1
  003 Essay equivalent to 1000 words 68  1

2CA491   Performance Practice 2:Artist as Witness  63   1 20  10 
  001 Essay - 1500 - 2000 words 63  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 2500 words) 63  1

2CA500   Introduction to Directing Theatre  66   1 20  10 
  001 A 10-12 minute student directed performance extract (w actors from the Theatre Production model) (equiv to 3000 words) 68  1
  002 Directorial Journal: A 2000 word journal that articulates a specific directorial process from page to stage 62  1

2CA510   Theatre Research: Comedy  65   1 20  10 
  001 Seminar Presentation (equivalent to 2500 words). 62  1
  002 Essay - 2500 words 67  1


2007/8

1CA050   Theories and Contexts :An Introduction to Cultural Politics  61   1 20  10 
  001 Expanded glossary (1500 words or equivalent) to include definitions of key terms 62  1
  002 Portfolio (3500 words or equivalent) to include three critical accounts/ readings of cultural practices 60  1

1CA060   Theories and Contexts 2:Representation  69   1 20  10 
  001 One group presentation (equivalent to 2500 words) 68  1
  002 One essay 2500 words that develops ideas put forward in the presentation 69  1

1CA440   Text Studies 1  65   1 10 
  001 An essay of 2500 words 65  1

1CA450   Acting workshop 1  70   1 10 
  001 Practical: Presentation of acting/rehearsal techniques (equivalent to 1250 words) 70  1
  002 Summative essay (Reflective Journal as appendix) of 1250 words 69  1

1CA460   Devising Studies 1  58   1 10 
  001 Essay (2500 words) 58  1

1CA471   Devising for Performance 1  72   1 10 
  001 Process based Assessment (equivalent to 1000 words) 70  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 1500 words) 73  1

1CA480   Text Studies 2  65   1 10 
  001 An essay of 2500 words 65  1

1CA490   Acting Workshop 2  61   1 10 
  001 Practical: Performance Presentations of acting techniques (50%)(equivalent of 1250 words) 58  1
  002 Reflective Journal on work issues raised in the module of 1250 words 64  1

1CA500   Devising Studies 2  64   1 10 
  001 Essay (2500 words) 64  1

1CA511   Devising for Performance 2  75   1 10 
  001 Process based assessment (equivalent to 1000 words) 70  1
  002 Performance (equivalent to 1500 words) 78  1


  Total credits gained 360 180  

4.4 Grading scheme:

All numeric grades on the transcript element are shown in the University’s 0-90 marking scale. All assessed work is marked according to the achievement represented. The minimum pass mark for an undergraduate module (Levels 0, 1, 2 and 3) is 40. The pass mark for a postgraduate module is 50. A maximum pass mark of 40 is available on re-examination for an undergraduate module. A maximum mark of 50 is available for re-examination for a postgraduate module. The degree classification for an honours degree is determined by consideration of the average mark derived from the credit-weighted average of all marks at levels 2 and 3. Other awards may be graded with merit or distinction, again determined by reference to the credit weighted average of module marks.

Students’ eligibility for award is determined on the basis of
  • Meeting the requirements of the relevant regulations by obtaining sufficient credits at the appropriate level
  • Meeting additional requirements as set out in the programme specification by passing all modules which are compulsory for award and sufficient optional or elective modules
The level of the award is determined on the basis of the classification average. This is derived from the credit-weighted average grade of the modules taken in the final level(s) of the programme.

Classification average for undergraduate awards Bachelors degree * Foundation Degree and other undergraduate awards
70 or above With honours class 1
Threshold average 68.5
With distinction
60 - 69 With honours class 2.1
Threshold average 59
With merit
50 - 59 With honours class 2.2
Threshold average 49.5
Pass
40 - 49 With honours class 3
Threshold average 40
Pass
0 - 39 Fail Fail
* The ordinary degree is awarded on the basis of accumulating at least 260 credits including 60 at honours level. It is not classified.
 
4.5 Overall classification of the qualification:
 
Class II Division i
 
  Classification average:
 
62.58
 

5 INFORMATION ON THE FUNCTION OF THE QUALIFICATION
 
5.1 Access to further study:
 
  Access to postgraduate study: Bologna FQ-EHEA 2nd cycle degree or diploma
 
5.2 Professional status (if applicable):
 
  Not applicable
 

6 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
6.1 Prizes:
 

 
  Additional formal roles:
 

 
6.2 Further information sources:
 
www.yorksj.ac.uk
 

7 CERTIFICATION OF THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT REPORT
 
7.1 Date of award:
 
8 July 2010
 
  Date of HEAR issue:
 
14 February 2011
 
7.2 Signature:
 

 
7.3 Capacity:
 
Registrar
 
7.4 Official seal:
 

8 INFORMATION ON THE NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM
Description of Higher Education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
 
     
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland (1), Higher Education institutions are independent, self-governing bodies active in teaching, research and scholarship and established by Royal Charter or legislation. Most are part-funded by government.

Higher Education (HE) is provided by many different types of institution. In addition to universities and university colleges, whose Charters and statutes are made through the Privy Council which advises the Queen on the granting of Royal Charters and incorporation of universities, there are a number of publicly-designated and autonomous institutions within the higher education sector. About ten per cent of higher education provision is available in colleges of further education by the authority of another duly empowered institution.