Conference Programme

Below you will find the full TAT 2018 programme, containing something of interest for everyone.

We hope that this year's Talking About Teaching programme includes a range of presentations, workshops and gimme 5 sessions to suit everyone from all backgrounds and academic disciplines.

For the first time, this year's poster presentations will include posters from our Students as Researchers scheme. These will be available to view throughout the day, with a more focussed session, chaired by Jane Rand (PVC Academic), immediately after the final break.

You can TAT 2018 Final Programme (without abstracts), or see below for more detailed information including abstracts.

Click below to view abstracts for the following:

TimeActivity
09:00-09:25 Registration and Refreshments
09:30-09:45 Welcome and Introduction: Dr Jane Rand, Pro Vice Chancelllor Academic.
09:45-10:45 Keynote, Professor David Carless, University of Hong Kong. “Teaching for quality student learning”
10:45-10:55 Break with refreshemnts
11:00-12:00 Parallel Presentations
12:00-12:45 Lunch
12:50-13:50 Parallel Workshops
14:00-15:00 Parallel Gimme 5 Talks
15:00-15:15 Break wth refreshemnts
15:20-15:50  Convened Poster Session
15:50-16:00  Final remarks and Prize Draw 
16:00  Close. 
   

 

Parallel Presentations, 11:00-12:00

Title: Self-coaching to become a more independent learner

Presenter(s): Alison Hayes
Room: DG/019
Strand: Research-led

Abstract: Inspired by Marsha Carr’s Self-Mentoring for leadership idea, (2015) as well as drawing on themes of independent learning from Zimmerman, Ponton and Carr, Ciekanski and a wealth of other researchers emphasising the benefits to students of reflecting upon their work and sharing those reflections with other students, I have created an innovative 4-step process whereby students become their own coach through reflecting on their skills, their support networks, their progress and achievements. The four stages involve self-awareness, (where students think about skills and knowledge they already possess and how to develop these further) self-development, (forming a plan, thinking about time-management, strengths and weaknesses) self-reflection, (reflecting on what is working and what is not and what can be done about this) and self-monitoring (checking progress and evaluating skills.) It works very well with my area, language learning and would be easily adaptable to other disciplines as well.

Title: Storytelling in Tourism Education: An Approach to Authenticating the Learning Environment

Presenter(s): Brendan Paddison
Room: DG/019
Strand: Research-led

Abstract: Authentic learning has attracted considerable attention amongst learning theorists as a pedagogical strategy that educators could adopt to address longstanding debates concerning curriculum effectiveness. Authentic learning can be defined as circumstances that resemble the complexity of the real-life application of knowledge. Although increasing support for the development of an integrated approach to the curriculum is evident, especially in tourism education, there is a lack of congruence between business practice and the university curriculum, resulting in tourism education becoming constrained with little relevance for practitioners. This has resulted in the encouragement to ground tourism education and research within authentic learning through a community of practice, which is concerned with the collaborative engagement of members through shared interactive tools, resources and knowledge. The ‘First Holidays Abroad’ project sought, through narrative research, to draw on the thoughts, memories and stories of people’s experiences of overseas holidays in the period between 1950 and 1975 as a topic designed to capture memories of overseas travel as a tool for reminiscence. 30 volunteers were interviewed, following a semi structured schedule, to ‘tell their stories’ of their first experience of foreign travel. We were particularly interested in how it felt to be in another country for the first time and the instances that people remembered most about their experience of travel and of being in a new environment. Those interviewed were encouraged to reflect upon the journey, the food, the weather, the people, the language, funny incidents, the hotel, how it felt then and how they feel now. These narratives and stories were then shared with tourism students as a resource for developing an understanding and reflecting upon people’s first holiday experiences of overseas travel within the context of authentic learning. The premise of this paper is to develop an understanding of how authentic learning was achieved through an interactive narrative research project concerned with facilitating student engagement in understanding past encounters in tourism through storytelling. Initial findings revealed much about the processes of memory, cultural awareness that accompanies travel and the cultural differences of the experience and engagement with people from other countries through tourism. In this context, authentic learning through storytelling contributed to the dialogical educational development of students through relationship building, knowledge co-creation and active citizenship. It provided opportunities for remembering, conversation, reflection and pleasure, facilitating positive social change amongst those stakeholders engaged in the research project.

Title: Teaching Within Musical Ensembles

Presenter(s): Murphy McCaleb
Room: DG/016
Strand: Pedagogic Research

Abstract: Strategies for teaching ensemble performance in higher education tend to draw on staff members as conductors or mentors. This approach to teaching can easily remain unexamined, either through habit or presumed beneficence, and thus music programmes and lecturers miss opportunities to explore potentially more efficient and effective ways of working. This research investigates a third path to lecturers’ involvement in university ensembles – one where the lecturer rehearses and performs with their students. Previous artistic research on ensemble interaction analyses how different types of leadership arise and are exerted within small ensembles (McCaleb, 2014). The flexibility of this leadership amongst group members may vary depending on the repertoire, balance of expertise around the ensemble, and other circumstantial factors. Professional chamber ensembles exhibit qualities similar to the business model of alternating leadership, where members assume ‘ad hoc leadership positions […] by temporarily and freely [alternating] back to be observers, followers, and so forth’ (Andert et al., 2011: 54); adopting this framework for teaching ensemble musicians in higher education encourages students to engage more critically in the development of the ensemble. Playing a larger leadership role (even temporarily) in ensembles allows students to ‘learn musical independence as they might learn civic participation, by making musical decisions that matter’ (Shieh and Allsup, 2016: 33). As part of an ongoing research project on ensemble pedagogy, this paper explores teaching strategies where a lecturer rehearses and performs within student ensembles to develop cultures of alternating leadership. Throughout this academic year, I am using rehearsal and performance observations, focus groups, and interviews to assess the effectiveness of this approach to small ensemble teaching across all three years of an undergraduate music programme in the United Kingdom. Thus far, two themes emerge: first, that regular engagement with the technical and interpretative decision-making that shapes the development of an ensemble is imperative for students to become effective ensemble musicians; second, that lecturers acting as co-musicians within ensembles can facilitate a flexible culture of leadership to allow students to alternatively lead and follow. In combination with my own critical reflection as an ensemble musician, this research will offer systematic strategies for helping students develop the skills required to develop as ensemble performers.

Title: Is statistics anxiety negatively associated with course performance?  A review of current evidence

Presenter(s): Kevin Ralston
Room: DG/016
Strand: Pedagogic Research

Abstract: It is suggested that non-maths students typically react negatively to courses including statistical methods, and that statistics modules induce anxiety. This paper summarizes the empirical evidence of the relationship between statistics anxiety and course performance. The aim of this work is to assess the belief that statistics anxiety has a negative effect on course/exam result. There are a relatively large proportion of studies incorporating bivariate and multivariate methods which find no significant relationship between statistics anxiety and course performance. Meta-analyses of studies reporting a correlation between statistics anxiety and performance are presented. These suggest a correlation ranging from -.260 (lower confidence interval, -.358, upper confidence interval, -.163) to -.284 (lower confidence interval, -.403, upper confidence interval, -.164). Meta-analysis of the correlation suggest an association, the results of studies which apply modelling approaches are more ambivalent. Unless it can be clearly empirically established that a student anxious about a statistics course is more likely to perform more poorly, we should put aside assumptions about the negative influence of statistics anxiety on performance.

Title: A critical exploration of women experiencing occupation-focussed activity groups whilst seeking asylum in the United Kingdom

Presenter(s): Hannah Spring and Fiona Howlett
Room: DG/125
Strand: Research-based

Abstract: The World Federation of Occupational Therapists (2014) has identified that refugees and asylum seekers lack access to meaningful and dignified occupations. The issues for asylum seeking women can often carry additional complexities (Steindl et al, 2008; Gupta and Sullivan, 2013). This presentation will outline a Students as Co-researchers (SCoRe) project within the BHSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy programme. In collaboration with two staff members, eleven final year students conducted a qualitative research study that critically explored the experiences of women who are seeking asylum and refugee status in the United Kingdom of participating in occupation-focused activity groups. As well as providing an overview of the study and its findings, the presentation will provide details of how the student research team worked together to develop the study methodology, collect and interpret data, and draw conclusions from the process. It will also cover key methodological and ethical issues the students had to negotiate in this culturally challenging study working directly with refugee and asylum seeking service users.

Title: Progression Issues: Uncool Fusion in Music Production

Presenter(s): Russ Hepworth-Sawyer, Dawid Ziemba & Nick Hughes
Room: DG/125
Strand: Research-based

Abstract: Student As Researcher Dawid Ziemba (BA Music Production year 2) and Russ Hepworth-Sawyer, alongside project partner Nick Hughes (Robert Smythe Academy) report on the research they've undertaken around the progressions routes for students ending up on music production courses in higher education. Their research has looked at the change in higher education provision since courses first started being offered, and during the project will seek to ascertain the barriers to smooth progression from KS3 all the way through to Higher Education. This project is still ongoing so results will potentially differ to expectations.

Title: Developing research skills and capacity in PGCE programmes

Presenter(s): Keither Parker, Emma McVittie, Ann Jones & David Scott
Room: DG/123
Strand: Research-orientated

Abstract: Students across the primary and secondary PGCE programmes undertake a research project as one of their Masters level assessments. This assessment activity is intended to give students the opportunity to investigate an area of teaching/school that they are highly interested in, whilst also developing empirical research skills, which are becoming ever more important in a climate of research informed teaching in our schools. This assignment was originally completed as a 6000 word written submission. It has now changed to a 2500 word written submission and 15 minute presentation at the PGCE Research Conference. This shift was intended to support broader student involvement and engagement, and improve the student experience of assessment.

Title: Case study research with bereaved clients in York St John Counselling & Mental Health Clinic: preparing for a valued specialism.

Presenter(s): John Wilson
Room: DG/123
Strand: Research-orientated

Abstract: Our research explores the psychology of schema construction in clients adapting to loss and grief. It is recognised that whilst secure clients adapt reasonably well to their changed circumstances, the same cannot be said of insecure clients. Our theory is that insecure counselling clients will be reluctant to assimilate new psychological constructs when compared to their secure counterparts. We expect to find this reflected in poorer outcomes. We have adopted and refined a means of measuring the rate of psychological change, using assimilation analysis of session transcriptions. We use theory-building case study methodology to confirm or refute our theory. The methodology allows the theory to be adapted and refined with each new case study, such that the theory builds over the duration of the project. The nature of our research lends a formative rather than summative aspect to accumulating useful data. The regular feedback this affords has benefits for the bereavement clinic team. Since each completed case study adds a small increment of new knowledge, research team members can make use of this to refine and develop their own professional development as reflexive and reflective counsellor/researchers. The Service Director facilitates a program of teaching current theories and models of bereavement and loss, supported by mentoring, to supplement team members’ research skill development. Our vision is that as our research students, having gained a specialism in bereavement and loss, move forward with their careers, critical thinking will remain central to their counselling practice, whether or not they remain engaged in formal research.

Title: Envisaging the future of a business school: engaging students in knowledge generation

Presenter(s): David Atkinson & Michael Heasman
Room: DG/124
Strand: Pedagogic Research

Abstract: By Dr David Atkinson (d.atkinson@yorksj.ac.uk) and Dr Michael Heasman (m.heasman@yorksj.ac.uk) The role of business schools and their educational purpose has come into harsh criticism in recent years. This critique has ranged from the topics being taught, to the teaching methods and the overall educational ‘culture’ of the business school. This presentation details an in-class exercise among two seminar groups of Masters business and management students in Organisational Change and Culture, who were asked to envisage the ideal leadership and management culture for a ‘new’ business school to be launched in York. Using the project GLOBE approach to understanding culture, students engaged in a discussion of cultural values across nine dimensions: performance orientation, future orientation, assertiveness, power distance, humane orientation, institutional collectivism, in-group collectivism, uncertainty avoidance and gender egalitarianism. Students developed surprising differences in how they would want a business school culture to be from that they saw as being currently practiced in business and wider society and Higher Education in general. The presentation details how students became involved in knowledge generation and considers the applications and limitations of such exercise as a pedagogical method.

Title: Food and the City: Lessons from developing a research-led short online course

Presenter(s): Michael Heasman
Room: DG/124
Strand: Research-led

Abstract: This presentation details the development, delivery, and lessons learnt from writing and running an innovative on-line short course as part of the educational component from a research based project. The course - called Food and the City: Understanding and Enabling Sustainable and Healthy Urban Food Systems - became one of the outputs from a wider research project called the Food-Smart City which was funded by Universities West Midlands with the aim to facilitate greater collaboration among the major universities in the West Midlands region. The course was created, written and developed by Dr Michael Heasman and Dr Adrian Morley (now at Manchester Metropolitan University) and open, free of charge, to the public as a way to engage a wider range of people in university research and teaching. The course enabled collaboration between five universities including one lesson which formed a Module assignment for Masters students at one of the collaborating institutions. The course ran for six weeks over June and July 2014 and consisted of 12 on-line lessons delivering more than 20 hours of content. The unique content developed for the course used a mixed media from written materials, interviews, film, quizzes and assessments. Around 350 people signed up for the course and out of these 50 completed all elements including a 500-word written assignment on which feedback was provided and received a certificate of participation. The presentation will focus on the design of the course, how the content was delivered, an evaluation and the main lessons learnt.

Title: Improving student efficacy through transferrable skills development : experiences from an accountancy skills development module.

Presenter(s): Wayne Fiddler
Room: DG/120
Strand: Pedagogic Research

Abstract: The identification of the variables that affect academic performance has been a subject of research for many years. In the field of accountancy there has been much emphasis by professional accountancy bodies on the development of key skills at a professional level which has impacted on the content of University degree courses in accountancy. Accounting students tend to be confident, highly motivated and expectant regarding the ability of their degree to develop the skills needed in the accountancy profession (Byrne and Flood, 2005). Drew and Watkins (1998), Lumsden (1994) and Byrne and Flood (2008) found that students who believe in themselves and have high levels of self-confidence, a characteristic termed self-efficacy, are likely to do better in their studies than students with low self-efficacy. The session is based on practical research that took place from September to December 2017. The aim of the work was to identify and enhance the generic skills of level 4 accountancy students through a process of referencing their skills against their peers. This was then followed up with reflection on their behaviour in the light of practical exercises and experience as a means of improving self-efficacy. Students with varying levels of confidence were looked at in terms of their perceived level of skills at the beginning and end of the module and whether this had any bearing on their end of year assessment performance from all of their first year modules.

Title: Collaboration with Media Industry Partners: Barriers, and Opportunities

Presenter(s): Jonathan Brown
Room: DG/120
Strand: Research-based

Abstract: Collaboration is essential to media production and journalism work. The growing emphasis by policymakers on situating universities at the centre of sector deals in core industries is affording new opportunities for HE institutions to engage in real-life collaborative projects which replicate creative professional practices and provide students with the confidence, knowledge and skills to break into their chosen field. But universities and industry move at different orbits. Curriculum restraints, timetabling and competing priorities in student lives can result in the emergence of obstacles that prevent effective collaboration taking place. By drawing on the experience of working with a range of partners over the past academic year, including York Mediale, That’s York TV, Two Rivers Radio and York Theatre Royal, this paper will consider some of the opportunities and barriers to successful engagement with external industry partners and suggest ways of developing future best practice in this emerging area.

Title: Fairness, Equality and Reducing ‘Free-Riding’: A Case Study on Implementing the Viva Warning Approach to Group Assessment

Presenter(s): Steven Cock, Julia Hopkins and Luke Clayton
Room: DG/014
Strand: Pedagogic Research

Abstract: The challenges of implementing group assessments effectively within higher education are often well-known to academic staff. Allocation of marks and issues of fairness in the assessment are longstanding issues in pedagogic literature. Another common problem for both staff and students is the issue of ‘free-riding’. Having introduced a viva warning approach to group assessment in a first-year (level four) undergraduate sports studies module in 2015-16, this presentation will examine the continued revision and development of this system during the following 2016-17 academic year. Drawing upon empirical data generated through questionnaires and focus groups, staff and student experiences of group assessment will be examined. It will be argued that ongoing revisions to the viva warning approach provided an appropriate basis to continue to manage instances of free-riding more effectively within the group work process.

Parallel Workshops, 12:50 - 13:50

Title: A simple guide to qualitative data analysis

Presenter(s): Katy Marsh-Davies
Room: DG/016
Strand: Research-orientated

Abstract: This workshop replicates an activity undertaken with 2nd year undergraduate business students as part of a research methods module which prepares them for their final year research projects or dissertations. The module team actively sought to avoid the usual assessment pattern of many business research methods modules that require some form of project proposal to be written. The innovative module assessment and delivery will be explained at the outset to provide context before the activity commences. The activity uses (fictional) qualitative data and allows participants to follow the steps necessary to conduct a simple content analysis. It demystifies the often over complicated process of qualitative data analysis. The purpose is to interpret the data and see whether existing theory is supported or challenged by the new research and whether the findings contribute anything new to the conversation. The activity should give participants the opportunity to understand the technique and transfer this to any qualitative data set. The workshop should appeal to those who teach research methods as well as those who wish to understand how to analyse qualitative data collected as part of their own research.

Title: Community Philosophy in practice

Presenter(s): Charlotte Haines Lyon
Room: DG/124
Strand: Research-led

Abstract: Community Philosophy is a group work method which encourages problematisation of issues affecting the community involved, the building of an argument, and developing appropriate action whether individual or collective. It is used in a wide variety of settings including schools, community projects and housing associations. I used Community Philosophy in my doctoral research with groups of parents in schools to explore issues regarding parent engagement. As it encourages people to problematise the world around them and apply philosophical thinking to such issues, I have also started to use it with students in class. I have found this has provided a space in which students can develop their critical thinking and explore different aspects of topics in ways more traditional teaching methods may not achieve. This workshop will take the form of a Community Philosophy session, allowing participants to experience and take part in a Community Philosophy session and see how it can be used in a higher education environment.

Title: Education for Sustainability

Presenter(s): Mike Calvert & Sarah Williams
Room: DG/125
Strand: Research-based

Abstract: Education for Sustainability has pushed its way towards the top of the agenda as Universities are recognising the need to address the three sustainabilities: environmental, economic and social in the curriculum. Plymouth University, a sector leader in the field, has helpfully identified 5 pedagogical elements: critical reflection, systematic thinking and analysis, participatory learning, thinking creatively for future scenarios and collaborative learning. There is talk of ‘engaged learning’ and the ‘connected curriculum’ in this context. The purpose of the workshop is to explore what we mean by the above terms in these contexts, look at models of teaching, learning and research in this area and look at how our curricula might align themselves with this agenda.

Title: Flexing verbal formative feedback to achieve different outcomes: lessons from school

Presenter(s): Katy Bloom & Caroline Elbra-Ramsay
Room: DG/123
Strand: Pedagogic Research

Abstract: Feedback is often viewed as the aspect most likely to increase learning (Black, Wiliam 1998, Gibbs, Simpson 2004) but successive NSS reports seem to suggest that our HE students do not perceive current feedback practice as valuable. This interactive session will look at how educators can flex their formative feedback to suit the learning needs being presented by their students. From looking at examples from the school sector, participants will be challenged to consider how effective practice can be transferred to Higher Education and the potential to progress traditional routes of assessment for a new generation of learners.

Title: Who, what, when, where and why?: Research and collaboration in curriculum design

Presenter(s): Matthew Denton; Adam Smith
Room: DG/127
Strand: Research-based

Abstract: This workshop session will be structured around the 5 questions of who, what, when, where and why, in relation to collaborative curriculum design. The session will explore the collaborative process of curriculum development of two newly validated programmes: a foundation year Humanities degree programme and a Politics programme with 9 strands. The session will explore the importance of collaborative approaches to curriculum design, highlighting how the underpinning learning, teaching and assessment strategies were designed to include problem and enquiry based approaches to teaching and learning.

Title: How to implement Student as Co-Researcher collaborative student and staff project opportunities and an article based assignment to enhance dissertation modules

Presenter(s): Alison Laver-Fawcett
Room: DG/019
Strand: Research-orientated

Abstract: Research informed teaching and engagement in research are expectations at York St John University. Our students are engaging in research / projects and undertaking research related assignments for dissertation modules and many staff have responsibilities for providing supervision for both undergraduate and taught-Masters students. Finding time for research and dissemination is often a barrier mentioned by staff in terms of their own research engagement and outputs. The occupational therapy programmes have offered a Student as Co-researcher (SCoRe) option on the dissertation module for over 8 years. The number of SCoRe projects being offered and taken up by students has steadily increased and many projects are now undertaken with external partners - providing rich 'real world' project opportunities for students. To facilitate the publication and dissemination of research from SCoRe projects, our ‘Contributing to the Evidence Base Module’ has replaced the 10,000 word dissertation assignment with a 5,000 word written assignment and 250 word abstract, formatted following authors’ guidance for a British Journal of Occupational Therapy article. Outputs from SCoRe projects have included the publication of peer reviewed journal articles, presentation at conferences and the production of service evaluation / project reports for external partners. This workshop will provide student and staff participants to: share their own experiences of research modules and assignments, discuss the opportunities and challenges of a SCoRe approach; consider examples drawn from our experiences of successfully collaborating in research with occupational therapy students and external partners; and debate the merits of different types of research based assignments. Within the workshop useful literature which has informed our approach will be shared, including: the Higher Education Academy's (HEA; 2015) ‘Framework for student engagement through partnership’; Healey, Flint and Harrington's (2014) 'Engaging through partnership: students as partners in learning and teaching in higher education' and Spronken-Smith, et al's (2013) 'Completing the research cycle: A framework for promoting dissemination of undergraduate research and inquiry Teaching & Learning Inquiry'.

Parallel Gimme 5 Talks, 14:00-15:00

Title: Writing retreats for undergraduate students

Presenter(s): Clare Cunningham
Room: DG/019
Strand: Pedagogic Research

Abstract: The use of writing retreats and structured writing sessions for academics is an area that has seen an increase in research and activity over the last ten years (cf. Murray and Newton, 2009; Murray, 2012). However, the opportunities for students to engage in such activities are often limited to postgraduate students through sessions in universities such as Shut Up and Write. The benefits for undergraduates of taking part in such structured writing sessions has been less explored but in the School of Languages and Linguistics such sessions have been offered to third year students for the last four academic years, with feedback from them has been immensely positive. In this session, I will offer my five tips for getting started in setting up supportive, structured sessions for undergraduate students to improve productivity and cut down on procrastination.

Title: Introducing flipped teaching

Presenter(s): Diane Cotterill
Room: DG/019
Strand: Pedagogic Research

Abstract: Professional skills and reasoning is a practical skills based 20 credit module offered on the BHSc (Hons) in occupational therapy. This module builds on knowledge, skills and attitudes developed at level 1. The module follows a flipped approach so there are no taught components but a series of tasks outlined in a workbook which require completion prior to attendance. During the workshops students are required to apply their learning from the workbook tasks to problem based scenarios. All the workshops are constructively aligned to the formative and summative assessment. A flipped approach was introduced in a bid to reduce the module failure rate, to promote inclusivity, autonomy and the development of problem solving skills, all of which are requirements for clinical practice. Since this change two years ago, the pass rate has increased and the feedback from students has been overwhelmingly positive.

Title: How to... Decolonise the Curriculum: Challenging Power, Whiteness, and Privilege in Module Design and Delivery

Presenter(s): Janine Bradbury
Room: DG/123
Strand: Research-led

Abstract: In this session, I share examples of how we are taking steps to decolonise the curriculum in the English Literature programme. Specifically, I will be offering examples of how I draw upon my research into representations of race in literature and culture as a tool that can be used to dismantle and challenge patriarchy, heteronormativity, white privilege, and ableism. I will also be discussing the implications of this for widening participation, student recruitment, and professional development. This session will offer five practical tips for all colleagues from across disciplines who are interested in decolonising our curriculum to implement. Additionally, and in the spirit of co-production and sharing best practice, we also invite attendees to feedback and discuss some of the disciplinary distinctions in tackling this issue. Facilitator biography: Janine Bradbury is a Senior Lecturer in Literature and the School Learning and Teaching Lead for Humanities, Religion and Philosophy. She is a specialist in African American literature and culture and has a professional background in widening participation, student recruitment, and equality and diversity work. She was a member of the Runnymede Trust's Emerging Scholars Forum which brought together 30 of the UK's most promising academics working on race.

Title: Home and international students - top tips for engagement and inclusion

Presenter(s): Emma Taylor
Room: DG/123
Strand: Pedagogic Research
Abstract: A practical session covering:

  1. tips for engaging & including International/ EAL students within the classroom/ lecture/ seminar setting
  2. mitigating the effects of academic shock (different teaching and learning approaches, such as relationships between teachers and students, forms of assessment and what counts as 'knowledge')
  3. a few simple changes in teaching style (i.e. making course and lecture structure more transparent) that can be really beneficial for international AND home students.

Title:  Supporting students with disabilities

Presenter(s): Katy Marsh-Davies
Room: DG/016
Strand: Pedagogic Research

Abstract: As well as being a matter of social justice, how best to support students with disabilities is currently high on the agenda for HEIs as TEF split metrics have reinforced that nationally students with disabilities are not as satisfied with many aspects of the student experience as students with no known disability. As we have drilled down into the data at YSJU we can see that outcomes for students with disabilities varies across disciplines. This session presents the findings of a Learning and Teaching Committee working group paper, which explored the metrics and used quantitative and qualitative research approaches to engage with student with disabilities, educators and support professionals, to design a set of principles for more inclusive learning, teaching and assessment practice for YSJU.

Title: Innovative programme design: programme level learning outcomes and assessment

Presenter(s): Alison Wadey
Room: DG/016
Strand: Pedagogic Research

Abstract: Having celebrated 40 years in 2017, the occupational therapy programme is well-established here at York St John University. The re-accreditation/revalidation of the undergraduate occupational therapy programme in 2018 afforded the opportunity to consider a new programme design to maintain and advance the contemporary nature of the facilitation of teaching and learning. The adoption of programme level learning outcomes enabled the development of a different approach to teaching and learning by challenging the traditional expectations of a multi-modular teaching, learning and assessment design.

Poster Presentations, available throughout the day with convened session at 15:20-15:50

All posters will be available until 14:00 in DG Foyer

And from 15:00 in Room DG/017

Title: Student as Researcher: The Words with Wagtails Project

Presenter(s): Adam James Smith
Strand: Research-based

Abstract: This poster, which will be delivered by both myself and third year undergraduate student Thomas Young (the Student Researcher assigned to my project), will showcase and advocate the benefits of ADD's 'Student as Researcher Scheme', demonstrating the various ways it has proved beneficial to the student, my own ongoing research and the university as a whole. The 'Words with Wagtails' project centres on the poetry of eighteenth-century radical poet and controversial newspaper man James Montgomery, exploring the relationships between print, politics and imprisonment in York during the long eighteenth century. Our website presents a digital archival of poetry written by political prisoners held in York Castle and invites responses from students, academics and the broader public, aspiring to reintroduce these eighteenth-century characters, stories and attitudes into the social and political landscape of twenty-first century York. This Student Research project was designed to broaden our corpus of primary material whilst also raising the project’s profile and accessing new audiences. In the first instance, Thomas has been tasked with conducting fairly extensive archival research, both in physical archives (such as York Minster Archive) and digital archives, such as the Burney Newspaper Archive and the York Castle Prison Catalogue of Prisoners. He has worked directly on the project's website and social media, whilst also proactively seeking out new creative and critical contributors for our growing archive of responses. We have also been mindful of tracking and reflecting on the varied activities that Thomas has undertaken, ensuring that he is able to capitalise fully on these experiences. For me, his work has been invaluable, giving me far more primary material to work with and increasing the project's local visibility.

Title: What is inspirational teaching and do formal academic professional development programmes prepare early career academics to be inspirational teachers?

Presenter(s): Allie Mason & Mark Dransfield
Strand: Research-based

Abstract: At the heart of this research investigation are two macro-level aims that are aligned with the nature of the professional doctorate. One is to make a contribution to knowledge, the other is to make a contribution to personal and professional practice. In order to achieve these aims, this research has been designed to investigate the 'lived experience' of four stakeholder groups, of the phenomenon of inspirational teaching within a Higher Education (HE) context. The exploration of this phenomenon is framed within the realm of formal professional academic staff development and the current HE landscape. It is hoped that developing a deeper understanding of the notion of inspirational teaching within HE can contribute towards the development of formal staff development programmes that exist within most universities across the UK.

Title: Perfectionistic Junior Athletes - Sarah Mallison-Howard

Presenter(s): Daniel Biggs
Strand: Research-based

Abstract: This poster presentation will focus upon my experiences of managing a project entitled ‘perfectionism, resilience and burnout’ in athletes as part of the student researcher programme. Perfectionism is a complex multidimensional trait that has shown to push athletes to the highest level of their sport but has also shown a maladaptive side to it as well (Stoeber, 2016). Namely, it has positive associations with athlete burnout. Psychological resilience has been described as the ability to experience adversity and adapt positively (Luthar & Cicchetti, 2000). This has been identified as a desirable characteristic for athletes and coaches within sport and may moderate undesirable characteristics (Fletcher & Sarkar, 2012). Thus, the aim of the research was to examine whether resilience may act as a buffer to the maladaptive tendencies of perfectionism on burnout. The Students as Researchers scheme has provided me with an excellent insight into the research process, which has furthered my academic experience and also aided my undergraduate study. I have engaged in a number of different tasks and also attended seminars, research conferences, and workshops, including academic skills, which has progressed my ability to search for existing literature on educational online data bases. Consequently, I used this skill set to help inform the selection of appropriate measures for the respective variables in the study. I also employed the skills learnt through workshops to devise an ethical application for the project and transfer the questionnaire from hard copy to an online option via Qualtrics. Finally, the scheme has extended my social academic network, not only have I been fortunate enough to interact with senior academics from York St. John but I have also liaised with researchers at Nottingham Trent University and Leeds Beckett University, who are collaborating on this research project. I have also managed participant recruitment.

Title: Overcoming issues of ‘free-riding’ in student group work: An examination of the viva warning approach.

Presenter(s): Julia Hopkins and Luke Clayton
Strand: Pedagogic Research

Abstract: The challenges of implementing group assessments effectively within higher education are often well-known to academic staff. Allocation of marks and issues of fairness in the assessment are longstanding issues in pedagogic literature. Another common problem for both staff and students is the issue of ‘free-riding’. Having introduced a viva warning approach to group assessment in a first-year (level four) undergraduate sports studies module in 2015-16, this presentation will examine the continued revision and development of this system during the following 2016-17 academic year. Drawing upon empirical data generated through questionnaires and focus groups, staff and student experiences of group assessment will be examined. It will be argued that ongoing revisions to the viva warning approach provided an appropriate basis to continue to manage instances of free-riding more effectively within the group work process.

Title: The pedagogical implications of occupational therapy students’ use of social media

Presenter(s):  Emma Robinson, Ahmah Ali & Maria Parks
Strand: Research-based

Abstract: Researchers would like to present a combination of findings from two undergraduate dissertation projects on the subject of occupational therapy education and social media. Social media is an increasingly prevalent technology in students’ learning as it has become ubiquitous in their lives. Literature proposes social media to be a valuable adjunct to healthcare teaching and learning, though students have been evidenced to hold mixed feelings towards this. Academic social media use fits with the social constructivist pedagogy informing many healthcare courses, which may incorporate problem based learning, flipped classroom and blended approaches (Poore 2014). Responding to a profession-specific literature gap, the first study employed a qualitative approach, using a novel online focus group, as well as a typical face to face focus group to explore 22 occupational therapy students’ attitudes towards using social media for academic purposes. The second study utilised a survey of 51 occupational therapy staff and students to explore how they engage on social media platforms and whether professional guidelines influenced online activity. In summary it was found that all of those surveyed use social media, mostly for personal use (89% staff; 98% students) and less frequently educationally (89% staff; 60% students) and for continued professional development (44% staff; 26%). Facebook was the most popular platform, and it was tentatively asserted that professional guidelines do influence online behaviour to some extent. Termed both “distressing”, “distracting” and “ambiguous”; and “helpful”, “efficient” and “practical”, participants expressed mixed, yet predominantly balanced attitudes to academic social media use in the second study. Concerns around mixing personal and professional identities, blurred boundaries, and confidentiality and professionalism, were also expressed, in addition to a potentially negative impact on mental health and wellbeing. These findings may contribute to informing best practice within occupational therapy education. Theory and participant-driven recommendations are: for institutions to facilitate students to make an informed choice, offer experiential teaching and positive examples of academic social media use, and embed digital professionalism and wellbeing into the curriculum. Mather, Douglas and O’Brien (2017) assert that explicit education around this topic during training is necessary to reduce fear of inappropriate professional behaviour and offer experiences to promote ‘digital professionalism’. Similarly, a need for more structured training on professional social media use at both pre and post registration levels has been recommended (Murray and Ward 2017), which is why this topic warrants further discussion. Presentation Outcomes: Delegates will have the opportunity to consider and discuss the potential ways in which social media may be used as an adjunct to teaching and learning, alongside the advantages and disadvantages of this. The evidence behind the aforementioned recommendations will be expanded upon, as well as practical ways in which this may be achieved, not only for healthcare courses, but across disciplines.

References

  • Mather, C., Douglas, T. and O’Brien, J. (2017) Identifying Opportunities to Integrate Digital Professionalism into Curriculum: A Comparison of Social Media Use by Health Profession Students at an Australian University in 2013 and 2016. Informatics 4, (2) pp. 10-24.
  • Murray, K. and Ward, K. (2017) Clicking your way through continuing professional development? Attitudes to social media use as a platform for continuing professional development (CPD) within occupational therapy. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 80 (8), pp. 75-76.
  • Poore, M. (2014) Studying and researching with social media. London. Sage.

Title: Creating a Scratch Interface for the Lego Mindstorms Robots

Presenter(s): Mike O'Dea and Carl Hetherington
Strand: Research-based

Abstract: The Lego Mindstorms are programmable robots, Scratch is a common programming Language for learning how to program. Scratch is aimed at, although not confined to, teaching children how to program. The Lego Robots have a special programming language that they need to enbale them to be programmed. We have created a Scratch version that works with the Lego Mindstorms robots, to replace the specific language. It means that the robots are now programmable by children using a language they are familiar with. The initial work for the project was carried out by lecturers in the Computer Science department. Student researchers and students on placement have contributed to the project by extending and testing the environment to get it ready for release.

Title: How York Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb: York’s Civil Defence Planning in the Early Cold War, 1945-1962.

Presenter(s): Penelope Hodgson
Strand: Research-based

Abstract: This research project seeks to examine the recently catalogued Civil Defence Records held at York Explore. It aims to consider how York planned to act in the case of a nuclear attack during the early Cold War period, particularly during times of heightened tension such as the Korean War and the Cuban Missile Crisis. This project will add to the historiography focussing on civil defence planning on a national and international basis by considering this issue from a local perspective. In addition, this project intends to build on links already forged between York St John University and York Explore. In 2015-16 History students undertaking work placements in their second year helped to compile the catalogue for the York Civil Defence Records. Moreover, the Project Supervisor has discussed this project with the Archivist at York Explore, Laura Yeoman, who has expressed full support.

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