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Undergraduate course

International Relations and History BA (Hons)

Discover how the events of the past have shaped international relations in the modern world.

Student at the minster library

Find out how history informs the ideas and debates taking place on the global stage today. Explore issues of state power, human rights and global justice. Investigate historical research from around the world to build a global view of our past, present and future.

York campus

  • UCAS Code – L230
  • Duration – 3 years full time | 6 years part time
  • Start date – September 2021
  • School – School of Humanities

Minimum Entry Requirements

    104 UCAS Tariff points

    3 GCSEs at grade C/4 (or equivalent) including English Language

Tuition Fees

    UK and EU 2021 entry £9,250 per year full time

    International 2021 entry £12,750 per year full time

The York St John Experience

Course overview

International Relations and History are closely related subjects. Studying them together will deepen your understanding of the institutions, processes and events that shape states and societies. Learning about the historical events which paved the way for contemporary international politics is crucial to fully understand them. Equally, we can apply some of the modern concepts and theories behind international relations to analyse historical events and processes. This Joint Honours degree will allow you to explore this relationship, while also delving deep into specialist topics.  We have designed the modules you will study to compliment and reinforce your learning across both subjects.

York has played a central part in many of our country’s stories. This makes it an inspiring place to study history. There are many ways you can explore these subjects beyond the classroom. You have the opportunity to:

  • Go on local, national and international field trips
  • Take part in a work experience project. Our connections in the city include York Museums Trust, York Explore and Yorkshire Film Archive.
  • Study abroad in your second year
  • Hear from visiting speakers with many different areas of expertise.
  • Attend conferences, seminars, workshops and events within the School.

By the end of your degree you will be able to explain the historical drivers of developments in international relations. You will have the expertise to analyse the current international political and economic landscape and identify the challenges that will shape our shared future.

Course structure

Year 1

Our academic year is split into 2 semesters. How many modules you take each semester will depend on whether you are st­udying full time or part time. You must study at least 1 module from each subject every semester.

In your first year, if you are a full time student, you will study:

  • 3 compulsory modules in semester 1
  • 3 compulsory modules in semester 2.

If you are a part time student, the modules above will be split over 2 years.

You can find out which modules are available in each semester on the Course Specifications.

Modules

  • Understanding World Politics (20 credits, compulsory)
  • Researching and Presenting the Past (20 credits, compulsory)
  • War and Society (20 credits, compulsory)
  • International Security (20 credits, compulsory)
  • Aid, Inequality and Development (20 credits, compulsory)
  • America: An Empire of Liberty? (20 credits, compulsory)

Year 2

In your second year, if you are a full time student, you will study:

  • 2 compulsory modules and 1 optional module in semester 1
  • 2 compulsory modules and 1 optional module in semester 2.

If you are a part time student, the modules above will be split over 2 years.

You can find out which modules are available in each semester on the Course Specifications.

Optional modules will run if they receive enough interest. It is not guaranteed that all modules will run every year.

Modules

  • International Relations: Theory and Practice (20 credits, compulsory)
  • History, Community and Culture (20 credits, compulsory)
  • International Political Economy (20 credits, optional)
  • Contemporary Security Challenges (20 credits, optional)
  • Making History (20 credits, compulsory)
  • Area Studies (20 credits, compulsory)
  • Reds! The Rise and Fall of Soviet Communism (20 credits, optional)
  • Slavery to Freedom (20 credits, optional)
  • The Republic in Danger (20 credits, optional)
  • The Nation Divided: America in the Civil War Era (20 credits, optional)
  • Mao’s China: From Empire to Communism (20 credits, optional)
  • Great Society: America in the 1960s (20 credits, optional)
  • Historical Specialisms (20 credits, optional)

Year 3

In your third year, if you are a full time student, you will study:

  • A dissertation module studied across semesters 1 and 2
  • 2 optional modules in semester 1
  • 2 optional module in semester 2.

If you are a part time student, the modules above will be split over 2 years.

You can find out which modules are available in each semester on the Course Specifications.

Optional modules will run if they receive enough interest. It is not guaranteed that all modules will run every year.

 

Modules

  • Global Governance (20 credits, optional)
  • The Politics of Global Health (20 credits, optional)
  • Intervention, Peacekeeping and the Responsibility to Protect (20 credits, optional)
  • Gender, Security and Conflict (20 credits, optional)
  • Technology and Visual International Politics (20 credits, optional)
  • Special Subject in Modern International History (20 credits, optional)
  • Special Subject in European History (20 credits, optional)
  • Special Subject in the History of the Cold War (20 credits, optional)
  • Special Subject in the History of the American Presidency (20 credits, optional)
  • Special Subject in the History of the Soviet Union (20 credits, optional)
  • Dissertation (40 credits, compulsory)

Entry Requirements

Qualifications

The minimum entry requirements for this course are:

104 UCAS Tariff points

3 GCSEs at grade C/4 or above (or equivalent) including English Language

International Students

If you are an international student you will need to show that your qualifications match our entry requirements. Information about international qualifications and entry requirements can be found on our international pages.

If your first language is not English you must show evidence of English language competence at IELTS level 6.0 (with no skill below 5.5) or equivalent.

International entry requirements

Foundation Year

This course is available with a foundation year. This option is ideal if you do not yet meet the minimum requirements for entry straight onto a degree course, or feel you are not quite ready for the transition to Higher Education. A foundation year prepares you for degree level study, giving you the confidence and skills needed to make the most of your course. Passing it guarantees you a place on this degree course the following academic year.

Foundation courses

Terms and conditions

Our terms and conditions, policies and procedures contain important information about studying at York St John University. These can be accessed through our Admissions webpages.

Teaching and Assessment

Teaching and learning

We use a range of teaching styles and settings to support your learning. This will include:

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops
  • Events
  • Field trips

1 to 1 sessions with your tutor are also an integral part of your learning. They are essential in providing feedback, addressing your individual study needs and fostering your personal academic development.

Alongside your timetabled contact time, you will be expected to study independently. This will ensure that you get the most out of your degree, as well as building valuable time management skills.

Assessment

We are committed to authentic, relevant assessment. Authentic assessments mean your work is kept relevant and reflects workplace tasks or further study.

  • Essays
  • Portfolios
  • Individual and group presentations
  • Video presentations
  • Posters
  • Group reports
  • Book/article reviews
  • study reports
  • Primary source exercises
  • Site reports
  • Open and closed exams
  • Reflective pieces

Feedback is essential in identifying what you have done well and how you can improve. You will receive detailed feedback on your final assessments for each module, as well as on formative assessments which help you to improve as you learn.

Fees and funding

To study for an undergraduate degree with us, you will need to pay tuition fees for your course. How much you pay depends on whether you live inside the UK or EU, or internationally (outside the UK/EU). Tuition fees may be subject to inflation in future years.

UK and EU 2021 entry

The tuition fee for 202 entry onto this course is

  • £9,250 per year for full time study
  • £6,935 per year for the first 4 years if you study part time.

These prices apply to all UK/EU, Jersey, Guernsey and Isle of Man students.

You can find out more about funding your degree by visiting our funding opportunities page.

Funding Opportunities

Placement year funding

If you choose to take a placement year, and your course offers it, you can apply for the Tuition Fee and Maintenance Loan for your placement year. How much you are awarded is based on the type of placement being undertaken and whether it is a paid or unpaid placement. The tuition fee for your placement year will be reduced.

International 2021 entry

The tuition fee for 2021 entry to this course is £12,750 per year for full time study.

This price applies to all students living outside the UK/EU.

Due to immigration laws, if you are an international student on a student visa, you must study full time. For more information about visa requirements and short-term study visas, please visit the International Visa and Immigration pages.

Find out more about funding your degree.

International Fees and Funding

Additional costs and financial support

There may also be some additional costs to take into account throughout your studies, including the cost of accommodation.

Course-related costs

While studying for your degree, there may be additional costs related to your course. This may include purchasing personal equipment and stationery, books and optional field trips.

Study Abroad

For more information on tuition fee reductions and additional costs for studying abroad, please visit our study abroad pages.

Accommodation and living costs

View our accommodation pages for detailed information on accommodation and living costs.

Financial help and support

Our Funding Advice team are here to help you with your finances throughout your degree. They offer a personal service that can help you with funding your studies and budgeting for living expenses. 

All undergraduates receive financial support through the York St John Aspire card. Find out more about the Aspire scheme and how it can be used to help you purchase equipment you need for your course. 

Aspire Card

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