Publications

The Publications Officer of the Seminar is Professor Leslie Francis of the University of Warwick, England. His contact details are on the Trustees and Committees page.

ISREV as an organisation has stimulated the publication of the following volumes:

Stephen Parker, Rob Freathy, and Leslie J. Francis (eds), Religious Education and Freedom of Religion and Belief (Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Wien: Peter Lang, 2012.) xii, 274 pp., 8 tables and graphs. Religion, Education and Values, Vol. 2, series edited by Stephen Parker, Leslie J. Francis, Rob Freathy and Mandy Robbins. ISBN 978-3-0343-0754-3 pb. (Softcover), ISBN 978-3-0353-0335-3 (eBook).

What opportunities and challenges are presented to religious education across the globe by the basic human right of freedom of religion and belief? To what extent does religious education facilitate or inhibit 'freedom of religion' in schools? What contribution can religious education make to freedom in the modern world?

This volume provides answers to these and related questions by drawing together a selection of the papers delivered at the seventeenth session of the International Seminar on Religious Education and Values held in Ottawa in 2010. These reflections from international scholars, drawing upon historical, theoretical and empirical perspectives, provide insights into the development of religious education in a range of national contexts, from Europe to Canada and South Africa, as well as illuminating possible future directions for the subject. For further details and to order, see the Peter Lang AG website. There is a 5% discount for library orders.

Jeff Astley, Leslie J. Francis, Mandy Robbins, Mualla Selçuk (eds), Teaching Religion, Teaching Truth: Theoretical and Empirical Perspectives (Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Wien: Peter Lang, 2012.) xii, 281 pp., num. tables. Religion, Education and Values, Vol. 1, series edited by Stephen Parker, Leslie J. Francis, Rob Freathy and Mandy Robbins. paperback ISBN 978-3-0343-0818-2.

Religious educators today are called upon to enable young people to develop as fully-rounded human beings in a multicultural and multifaith world. It is no longer sufficient to teach about the history of religions: religion is not relegated to the past. It is no longer sufficient to teach about the observable outward phenomena of religions: religion is not restricted to practices, artefacts, and buildings observable in the outside world. It is also necessary to take seriously what religions believe about themselves, and what religions believe about other religions.

Seen from the inside, religions deal in the currency of truth. For the religions themselves, truth matters. Truth-claims can lead to harmony and peace, but they may also engender discord and violence. What ultimately counts is how one set of truth-claims confronts or embraces the truths claimed by other, different voices. Therefore those who teach religion cannot avoid dealing with the theology of religions.

In this collection of original essays, religious educators shaped by both Christian and Islamic worldviews discuss the problems and opportunities that now face educators and believers alike, as they are confronted by the challenge of teaching religion and teaching truth. The discussion nurtured at the sixteenth conference of the International Seminar on Religious Education and Values is here developed further, to stimulate wider reflection and shape good local practice.  To order, see the bottom of the Peter Lang AG New Publication sheet. There is a 5% discount for library orders.

Wilna A.J. Meijer, Siebren Miedema, Alma Lanser-van der Velde (Eds), Religious Education in a World of Religious Diversity (Münster/New York/München/Berlin: Waxmann, 2009) 218 pages, paperback ISBN 978-3-8309-2193-6.

This volume brings together a selection of papers presented at the Fifteenth Session of the International Seminar on Religious Education and Values (ISREV), which took place in 2006 in Driebergen, the Netherlands, addressing the theme ’Religious Education in a World of Religious Diversity‘.

The authors were invited to combine the concept of diversity with the dimensions of temporality, of time and history in reworking their contributions for this book. This temporal aspect is in a sense inherent in educational thinking. On the one hand education as intergenerational transmission has a conservative aspect: tradition being what is actually and presently transmitted from the past and/or what is considered worthwhile to be passed on. On the other hand, acknowledging the activity of students themselves as a prerequisite for any education to happen, brings the open-endedness and therefore the future into the pedagogical arena in terms of development, learning, reflection, edification, et cetera.

So, the question answered in this volume is what does this inherent historicity mean for religious education as well as for (the concept) religion and religious diversity? In answering this question the contributions represent the global character of the concern with religious diversity in relation to religious education, and originate respectively from the following countries: Canada (Bhikkhu, English), United States (Moran), Latvia (Ilishko), Russia (Kozyrev), Germany (Pirner), South Africa (Roux, du Preez, Ferguson), Japan (Omori), Australia (de Souza), Turkey (Selçuk), and the Netherlands (Meijer, Miedema).  To order, see the bottom of the Waxmann New Release Sheet (PDF 101.1KB).

Jeff Astley, Leslie J Francis and Mandy Robbins (Eds), Peace or Violence: the ends of religion and education? Religion, Education and Culture series (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2007) vii + 222pp ISBN 978-0-7083-2078-5 hardback £75 UK.

Do religions and religious education intend peace or violence, and which of these ends do these activities really serve? While many claim that religion is responsible for most of the violence that currently poisons the peace of peoples and nations, and some seek a moratorium on religious education as a necessary preliminary to creating a peaceful society, the authors of these essays contend that religious education itself can be a force for peace. Certainly, issues of peace and violence should be of central concern to those who teach and explore religion and its communication. For further details, or in case of difficulty in ordering, see a longer summary at NEICE or NEICE-Related Publications. Buy this book on Amazon

Leslie J Francis, Mandy Robbins and Jeff Astley (Eds), Religion, Education and Adolescence: International Empirical Perspectives Religion, Education and Culture series (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2005) xii + 272pp ISBN 0-7083-1957-2 hardback £45 UK.

Religious diversity, religious enthusiasm, and religious misunderstanding remain at the heart of so much social, economic and political conflict in the world today. Never before has religious education been so important. In this climate, religious educators have become increasingly aware of the significance of listening to the religious perceptions of adolescents, using the best research techniques pioneered by the empirical social sciences, including sociology, psychology, and anthropology. This collection of innovative and pioneering empirical studies, sponsored by the International Seminar on Religious Education and Values, draws together Christian, Islamic, and Jewish perspectives from England, Germany, Israel, Norway, Turkey and Wales.  Buy this book on Amazon

Leslie J Francis, Jeff Astley and Mandy Robbins (Eds), The Fourth R for the Third Millennium: Education in Religion and Values for the Global Future (Dublin: Lindisfarne Books, 2001) ISBN 1-8539-0507-0 £11.99 UK.  Buy this book on Amazon

Leslie J Francis and Yaakov J Katz (Eds), Joining and Leaving Religion: Research Perspectives (Leominster: Gracewing, 2000) 320pp ISBN 0-8524-4517-2 £20 UK. In 2000 this volume of essays in memory of Dr Motti Bar-Lev was presented to the members of the Bar-Lev family, during the Session of the International Seminar on Religious Education and Values that took place in Israel that year. Buy this book on Amazon

Stephen Parker, Rob Freathy and Leslie J Francis (eds) (2015) History, Remembrance and Religious Education; Oxford: Peter Lang.

How should the Holocaust be taught in schools, and to what end? What role should religious education play in recounting and remembering this human catastrophe? How has the nature and purpose of religious education changed and developed over time? What contribution should religious education make to identity formation, particularly regarding the role of memory, heritage and tradition? The scholarly reflections in this volume, drawing upon historical, theoretical and empirical perspectives, provide insights into past, present and potential future developments in religious and values education in a range of national contexts, including Germany, Israel, Norway, Canada and South Africa. The chapters fall under three headings: fostering a culture of remembrance; historical perspectives on religious education; and history, tradition, memory and identity. Together they form a unique collection of international perspectives upon these interlocking themes. Buy this book on Amazon