School of Education Events

Explore the exciting events and activities being held in the School of Education.

Upcoming Events

100 Years in 11 Films 

The School of Education will be hosting a weekly event, exploring 100 years of cinema through 11 films. 

This event will be held on each Thursday starting on the 8th March 2019 at 6:00pm. The screenings will be held in Quad South 111. 

Attendees are welcome to bring tipples and nibbles to share and enjoy! 

If you would like to attend this event, please follow this link to our Eventbrite page

Programme of Screenings: 

Week 1 March 8th.  The Cabinet of Dr Caligari (1919) - Robert Wiene

Week 2 March 14thMetropolis (1927) - Fritz Lang

Week 3 March 21st. M (1931) - Frizt Lang 

Week 4 March 28th. The Big Sleep (1946) - Howard Hawks

Week 5 April 4thThe Night of the Hunter (1955) - Charles Laguhton

Week 6 April 11thThe Battle of Algiers (1966) - Gillo Pontecorvo

Week 7 May 2ndDeliverance (1972) - John Boorman

Week 8 May 9th. Do The Right Thing (1989) - Spike Lee

Week 9 May 16thRatcatcher (1999) - Lynne Ramsay

Week 10 May 30thPersepolis (2007) - Marjane Satrapi & Vincent Paronnaud

Week 11 June 6thGod's Own Country (2017) - Francis Lee

School of Education Reading Group

We will be reading Calvin Thomas’ (2013) Ten Lessons in Theory: An Introduction to Theoretical Writing. which can be found here: Ten Lessons in Theory. Thomas' book sketches out why theoretical writing is both useful and enriching for academic research (see Mari Ruti’s review below). It is based around ten "lessons," each grounded in a different theorist or idea. We will be taking the first five lessons this semester and the second five next semester.

The second series of lesson will be held on the below dates: 

6 - Wednesday 27th February - 12:00 - 14:00 TU/001

7 - Wednesday 13th March - 12:00 - 14:00 TU/001

8 - Wednesday 17th March- 12:00 - 14:00 TU/001

9 - Wednesday 1st May  - 12:00 - 14:00 TU/001

10 - Wednesday 22nd May- 12:00 - 14:00 TU/001

If you would like to attend please send Dr Jonathan Vincent an email via j.vincent1@yorksj.ac.uk 

School of Education Research Cafe

Our research café is a collegiate group of researchers who meet informally to discuss their work. Researchers can bring issues relating to their research which is puzzling them to discuss with their peers. 

Upcoming Research Cafe's

Wednesday 27th February - 12:00 - 13:00 TU/001

Wednesday 13th March - 12:00 - 13:00 TU/001

Wednesday 17th April - 12:00 - 13:00 TU/001

Wednesday 1st May  - 12:00 - 13:00 TU/001

Wednesday 22nd May- 12:00 - 13:00 TU/001

Alex Moore Seminar: 'The Affected Teacher:  Psychosocial perspectives  on professional experience and policy resistance'

At a time when teaching and learning policy too often presents itself in  a simplistic input-output language of measurable targets and objectives, this seminar will draw on interviews and informal discussions with practising teachers to explore the role of emotionality - or more precisely what is known as affect - in how professional life is  experienced. It will consider how neoliberal education policy, informed by powerful discourses of performativity and competition, attempts  to mould professional subjectivities, relationships and practices; how teachers experience and manage feelings which may be marginalised or frowned upon politically and institutionally; and the role that affect plays in guiding either compliance with or resistance to often unpopular policy directives. It will be argued that employing particular forms of psychosocially-informed reflexivity, both individually and in self-forming groups, in which professionals acknowledge themselves as affected subjects,  can act as a positive contribution to professional and personal development, as a means to promoting or restoring collegiality,  and as a way of keeping alive alternative beliefs and understandings regarding the fundamental purposes of public education.' 

 20th March at 13:00 Holgate 139

Tamara Bibby Seminar: Using Winnicott to rethink schools (and universities) and schooling (and other learning)

At a time when education is largely thought of in terms of its performative features, how can we think about creativity and rediscover our own creative impulses as teachers and researchers? What does that mean? 

Drawing on her recent book 'The Creative Self: Psychoanalysis, Teaching and Learning in the Classroom', this seminar will provide teachers, teacher educators and others involved with learning processes and learning environments with an opportunity to explore their work in relation to writing of the psychoanalyst Donald Woods Winnicott. It will also be a time for researchers to reflect on the kinds of theoretical lenses that they bring to their analyses of classrooms, seminar rooms and lecture theatres.

4th April 2019 17:00 in De Grey 109

Mike Bottery Seminar: Education Leaders for Social Change: Re-focusing the Agenda  

This paper makes the case for a  mainstream educational code which would work through forms of social change to counter threats to environmental, social and leadership sustainability. It calls for the highlighting of a number of under-recognised processes which have significant effects upon all three of these areas. The paper concludes by describing a number of significant implications for the manner in which social change needs approaching, and in so doing argues for the role of the educational leader as one of an ethical dialectician.

8th May 1.30pm SK127

Donald Simpson Seminar: Parenting high achieving working class boys in poverty - problematizing ‘active cultivation’ as an explanation for ‘beat'

A powerful discursive formation claims the wrong type of parenting amongst the poor predisposes their children to educational underachievement. A small number of children in poverty ‘succeeding against the odds’ in early education potentially undermines this construction of ‘parent blame’ as despite their alleged shortcomings some disadvantaged parents rear their children to succeed in assessments. This requires an explanation which perpetuates the dominant discourse about deficiencies amongst the poor; one which suggests ‘good parenting’ is resource free, class-neutral and achievable once parents in poverty change how they think and act. I will show how the concept of active cultivation has gained traction because it offers this. But, much research questions the existence of widespread ‘bad parenting’ amongst the poor. Moreover, I will draw on data collected from parents in poverty whose children ‘beat the odds’ in early education to question active cultivation's explanatory value. I will claim its use underplays the importance of resources and social class in parenting and it is part of a wider trope justifying political direction. 

15th May 13:00 in Skell 127

 

Past Events - School of Education

Children’s Voices Reworked - Sue Shippen

Sue Shippen

When children’s voices are heard by an adult worker there is a danger that they are not being listened to. This is not usually deliberate on the part of the adult but suggests that factors such as power relationships and report-writing requirements can lead to a situation where the child’s explicit wishes are reworked, and even distorted, to align with adult needs. This research investigates the tensions between intentions – implicit and explicit - that are present when completing assessment plans with children and makes suggestions for greater fidelity to children’s voices in future action plans. 

21 November

13.00pm

Skell 127

'A system in crisis? Schooling in England since 2010.' Ken Jones

'A system in crisis? Schooling in England since 2010.' - Ken Jones

In terms of curriculum, assessment, governance and accountability England's school system continues to be based on the foundations laid by the 1988 Education Reform Act. The Coalition government of 2010-2015 accentuated and accelerated several aspects of the 1988 system, in a context of austerity and rising pressures on school funding. In this presentation, I will explore the effects of policy change on English schooling, asking whether we still have a sustainable model of primary and secondary education, and reflecting on alternative policy approaches.

7 November 2018

13.30pm

Quad East 104

The Future of Education, Democracy & Social Justice

The Future of Education, Democracy and Social Justice

Over a century ago, with the publication of Democracy and Education, John Dewey argued for the mutually dependent relationship linking a legitimate education system and a thriving democracy. Currently, a number of developments undermine the prospects for strong links between education, democracy and social justice including:

  • The growth of inequality in wealth and income, highlighted recently by the OECD and other commentators
  • The rise of performativity and the translation of democratic deliberation and decision making into matters of techno-rationality and efficiency
  • The dismantling of connections between local representative government and education
  • The growth of private forms of educational provision and governance, including private schools and private tutors
  • The promotion of authoritarian cultures and disciplinary regimes in schools
  • The rise of extremism, including religious extremism, and the growing support for extreme right-wing parties and ideas;

Against this background the contributors to this seminar address the question of the relationship – real, ideal and potential – between education, democracy and social justice

Contributors include:
Professor Richard Pring
Professor Carol Vincent
Professor Martin Mills
Venue: De Grey Lecture Theatre

Wine reception: 18.00
Event start: 18.45
Event finish: 20.45

 

Between being and becoming - Jonathan Vincent Seminar

Between being and becoming: transitions from higher education for emerging adults on the autism spectrum - Seminar With Dr Jonathan Vincent

Close up photo of Senior Lecturer Dr Jonathan Vincent, teaching in a classroom, holding piece of paper.

This paper outlines some key findings from Jonathan’s recent PhD thesis which uncovered, through a qualitative design, the enabling and disabling factors that affect the transitions from higher education for emerging adults on the autism spectrum. Based on twenty-one in-depth interviews with university students and recent graduates this paper offers initial theorisation regarding the nature of transition for this group and argues for a nested, yet fluid, conception of the phenomenon across practical, psychological and philosophical domains. 

3 October 2018

15.30

De Grey 121

This paper outlines some key findings from Jonathan’s recent PhD thesis which uncovered, through a qualitative design, the enabling and disabling factors that affect the transitions from higher education for emerging adults on the autism spectrum. Based on twenty-one in-depth interviews with university students and recent graduates this paper offers initial theorisation regarding the nature of transition for this group and argues for a nested, yet fluid, conception of the phenomenon across practical, psychological and philosophical domains. 

3 October 2018

15.30

De Grey 121

 

"Publicness" in Education - Bob Lingard and Greg Thompson

Around the world a soft revolution is taking place. This revolution is focused on how governments and their citizens think about the ‘public’ in public policy, especially in the context of health and education and their public institutions. One example is the emergence of ‘alternate provision’ of public schooling. There are many reasons for this emergence - from concerns regarding education outcomes with regards to certain disadvantaged groups; to ‘education for all’ arguments that support the establishment of low-fee private and for-profit schools in countries like Ghana; to the school choice movement in countries like the United States and England which has created the conditions for academy schools, free schools and charter schools. Most forms of alternate provision involve public-private partnerships where private interests are key players.

The shift in the work that the word ‘public’ does in conversations about education is important to understand and think our way through. For example, in Australia the Federal Treasurer Scott Morrison recently argued that it is time for ‘for-profit’ public schools. How is it that a for-profit school, a school that generates profits for a private entity, can be considered a public school? Partly, we think this occurs because what can empirically characterise the public in the imaginary of policy makers has become reduced to considerations of funding alone. This is a dangerous reduction, and somewhat at odds with what may be considered the ways that the public is generally understood and used by teachers, parents and the wider public. One way to respond to this reduction is to re-appraise the characteristics that constitute the public in public education.

In this seminar, we will present our Australia Research Council funded research, to consider what constitutes the ‘public’, or publicness, in public education.

24  September 2018

17:30 

Holgate 136

Flowers in front of Lord Mayors Walk
Students outside De Grey
Fountains Learning Centre

York St John Research Events

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