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Undergraduate Course

Japanese, Intercultural Communication and Linguistics BA (Hons)

Immerse yourself in our multilingual world by learning Japanese. Explore how language is structured and shaped by culture and identity.

Japanese magazines on table

Learn the skills you need to work in Japan or pursue an international career. It's a 4 year degree that includes a year studying in Japan. You will learn communicative Japanese skills and gain a deep understanding of Japanese culture. You will gain insight into the structure of different languages and sociocultural practices. You will also learn to communicate across cultures.

York campus

  • UCAS Code – T2X5
  • Duration – 4 years full time
  • Start date – September 2021
  • School – School of Education, Language and Psychology

Minimum Entry Requirements

    96 UCAS Tariff points

    3 GCSEs at grade C/4 (or equivalent) including English Language.

Tuition Fees

    UK and EU 2021 entry £9,250 per year full time

    International 2021 entry £12,750 per year full time

Discover why York St John is The One

Course overview

Study Japanese whether you are a beginner or have some previous experience with the language. We will place you at the appropriate level of language learning when you arrive. By the end of the course you will be able to have conversations in Japanese. You will learn to give presentations and write in Japanese, allowing you to use the language for academic, social and professional purposes. You will usually reach the upper B2/C1 level on the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFR). You can also choose to take the Japanese Language Proficiency Test at level 6 for not extra cost. Please note that this course is not suitable for applicants who already have B1 level or above of the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFR) in Japanese.

Immerse yourself in Japanese culture with a year studying abroad in Japan. While abroad you will take Japanese language classes at your host university. You will also take classes taught in English or Japanese that are relevant to your degree.

Our approach to teaching Intercultural Communication will give you both theoretical expertise and experience of communicating with people from different cultures. You will explore how language relates to speakers' intentions and purposes in social interaction. You may also examine how language choices can express identities and cultural values.

The Linguistics part of the course gives you a working knowledge of how language works, how we use it and how it is structured. You will explore how we articulate speech and how English differs around the world. Depending on the modules you choose, you can learn how the mind processes language, how English is used around the world, or feminist and queer applications of linguistics.

Take a look at our other Japanese degree if teaching English in Japan interests you:

JAPANESE, TESOL AND LINGUISTICS BA (HONS)

Course structure

Year 1

Our academic year is split into 2 semesters. You can only study this course full time.

In your first year you will study: 

  • 1 language module in each of semesters 1 and 2, at the right level for you
  • 2 compulsory modules in semester 1
  • 1 compulsory module and 1 optional module in semester 2.

You can find out which modules are available in each semester on the Course Specifications.

Optional modules will run if they receive enough interest. It is not guaranteed that all modules will run every year.

Modules

Credits: 20

Compulsory Module

 Which version of this module you study will depend on your previous experience of studying Japanese.

If you have little or no experience, you will be placed in Accelerated Japanese 1. Working in pairs and groups, you will focus on communicating and expressing yourself in Japanese. This will teach you not only to speak the language but also to comprehend the speech of others. You will also begin writing with the Japanese lettering systems: Hiragana and Katakana.

If you have more experience, you will be placed in Japanese Communication 1. You will develop your abilities to speak in Japanese and understand others. You will write and tell creative narratives about events in the past or future. In both speech and in writing you will describe people and places in detail and express your thoughts and opinions.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

This module will introduce you to key ideas and concepts in the study of language and society. You will explore how language varies over time and how social changes can impact language. While looking at different ways of analysing language variation, you will look at variations in phonetics, lexicon, grammar and register. You will also consider how language is used to reflect and construct social identities like social class, gender, sexuality and more.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

On this module we will introduce you to the linguistic areas of study that you will build on throughout your degree. This includes the basics of phonetics and grammar. You will study:

  • Contemporary issues and debates about language use
  • The historical development of language and of English
  • Academic reading, writing and referencing techniques

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

This module builds on your knowledge from your previous language module.

If you are placed in Accelerated Japanese 2 you will learn to talk and write about places and people, things you have done in the past and your thoughts and opinions. You will also take weekly kanji practice tests to help you develop your Japanese character writing. These tests do not contribute towards your grades, they are designed to help you develop your skills.

If you are placed in Japanese Communication 2 you will develop your understanding of Japanese by learning to talk and write about desires and plans. You will receive feedback on your writing as you start to read and write more complex sentences.

Credits: 20

Optional module

This module is your introduction to the traditional foundations of Deaf communities and the key contemporary debates in Deaf studies. You will learn essential information such as when to capitalise the word deaf and the roots of Deaf culture in the UK and the USA. The topics you study on this module will be the foundation of your knowledge in Deaf studies.

Credits: 20

Optional module

On this module you will address the world’s linguistic diversity and consider the place of the English language in our multilingual world. You will consider language variation and multilingualism from linguistic, psychological, sociocultural and educational perspectives by studying topics like:

  • The multilingual mind and how multilingualism affects identity
  • The commodification of language
  • Bilingual education
  • Language policy and planning
  • Multilingualism and the arts

Credits: 20

Optional module

OThis module is your introduction to the principles of articulatory and practical phonetics. You will learn how to recognise, describe and produce some of the sounds and symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet. This means you will be able to recognise, transcribe and analyse sounds in varieties of English, other languages and children's language.

Year 2

In your second year you will study:

  • 1 compulsory module and 2 optional modules in semester 1
  • 2 compulsory modules and 1 optional module in semester 2

You can find out which modules are available in each semester on the Course Specifications.

Optional modules will run if they receive enough interest. It is not guaranteed that all modules will run every year.

Modules

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

On this module you will gain practical Japanese language skills. You will develop these skills by talking about and discussing Japanese society and culture. You will look at contemporary issues and current affairs in Japan, reading news articles and discussing them in groups. You will also consider the education system in Japan, from school to university. This module not only improves your language skills but develops your understanding of Japanese culture.

Credits: 20

Optional module

On this module you will develop advanced skills in reading and analysing texts across different genres and sensory perceptions. You will study different theories and methods of analysis to understand issues of representation and power in contemporary debates. The knowledge you gain in this module will help you to apply these theories more widely in later modules.

Credits: 20

Optional module

This module is your introduction to the core principles of phonology. We will introduce you to aspects of phonetics and phonology that will help you analyse variations in language, like child phonology and languages other than English. Topics you will cover on this module include:

  • The concept of the phoneme
  • Narrow allophonic transcription
  • Phonotactics and syllable structure
  • Transcription skills
  • Phonological features.

Credits: 20

Optional module

On this module you will learn about the key areas of feminist and queer linguistic study. You will learn about different theories and approaches to the study of language, gender and sexuality. This will give you the knowledge and confidence to develop your own position on these topics, arguing them effectively in your written work. You will also consider how these theories and approaches have been applied to other fields of study, like education, the workplace and in the media.

Credits: 20

Optional module

This module will give you a deeper understanding of how the English language is spread across the globe. You will study the history of English both in the British Isles and abroad, thinking about the social history of language change, variety and status. You will explore the concept of standard varieties of English and the structural variation in major international varieties of English.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

This module continues your learning from Japanese Language and Society 1. You will develop your social and cultural exploration and expand you written and verbal language skills. While continuing to study current affairs, you will also look at festivals and annual events in Japan. You will also explore Japanese food culture. Studying the onomatopoeic expressions in Japanese, the sounds used in the language to convey feeling, will deepen your understanding of the language.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

This module will deepen both your theoretical knowledge of intercultural communication and your practical abilities. You will study case studies from around the world as you explore the meaning of culture. You will look at how culture is represented in the media, in textbooks and in the tourist industry and start to understand culture beyond stereotypes. You will consider how we can define language and develop your communication and intercultural skills.

Credits: 20

Optional module

This module will introduce you to the field of forensic linguistics. You will learn how to analyse language as forensic evidence for different crimes such as rape, terrorism, murder and hate crimes. Applying your knowledge of linguistics, you will also look at how language is used in the justice system, from police interviews to language in the courtroom.

Credits: 20

Optional module

On this module you will learn to apply your linguistic knowledge to literacy acquisition. You will examine how oral language development feeds into reading and writing development. We will teach you how to analyse reading and writing performance at various stages of literacy development. By the end of the module you will understand the reading and writing children engage with at different ages and be able to explain their literacy development.

Credits: 20

Optional module

This module will help you develop an awareness of the psychological elements of language. You will learn about:

  • Visual word recognition
  • How we learn to read and spell
  • Spoken work recognition
  • Language production.

As part of the module you will develop skills in research design, collecting data and analysing it. You will also gain experience in writing up your findings in a report.

Credits: 20

Optional module

This module will help you develop an awareness of the sociocultural aspects of language. You will investigate the issues that affect how language is used in different areas of everyday life. You will learn about different theories and approaches to sociolinguistic study and look at topics such as social and linguistic variation and social justice.

Year 3

In your third year you will spend time studying in Japan.

While abroad, you will take Japanese classes at the university you are studying at. You will also take classes that are relevant to your degree. These classes might be taught in Japanese or English.

You will complete a work placement module online while you are studying abroad. This will include 10 days of work experience. At the end of the year you will produce a reflective report. This is a chance to evaluate your experiences and consider how they relate to your studies.

Modules

Credits: 0

Compulsory module

You will study this module while you are abroad. You will reflect on your year abroad, focusing on how your experiences relate to what you have studied. As part of this module you will complete and reflect on 10 days of work experience, either abroad or when you are back in the UK.

Year 4

In your fourth year you will study:

  • 2 compulsory module and 1 optional module in semester 1
  • 1 compulsory module and a dissertation module in semester 2.

You can find out which modules are available in each semester on the Course Specifications.

Modules

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

On this module you will focus on developing your Japanese language skills for academic purposes. You will learn basic research skills and conduct a study in an area that interests you. You may choose to focus on international relations in East Asia or sociocultural issues such as gender and minority groups in Japan. Alternatively, you could look at Japanese pragmatics and sociolinguistics, such as politeness or honorifics. Whichever you choose, you will write up your findings and present them verbally in Japanese.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

On this module you will explore how language can be an indicator of different social and cultural identities, as well as contributing to the construction of these identities. You will apply skills you have learnt in previous modules in analysing spoken and written texts, and develop them further. This module gives you the chance to take an interdisciplinary approach to analysing the relationship between language, identity and culture. This means you might draw on other academic subject areas, such as sociology while studying.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

As you continue with your project from Japanese Language Project 1, you will also cover employability skills. We will give you help and advice with CV writing and on interview techniques. You will study and discuss these topics in Japanese, allowing you to develop your fluency even further. You will also look at translation and interpreting in the workplace and how you might use these skills in the future.

Credits: 20

Optional module

On this module you will study how the public views language and consider the social and political issues surrounding these views. You will look at Standard English and ideas about correctness and consider public attitudes towards bilingualism and new language. You will also discuss taboo language and how attitudes can change because of technological developments.

Credits: 20

Optional module

This module offers an in depth exploration of the linguistics and culture of East Asia. This will increase understanding of the wider context of the language you are learning. We will cover structural aspects of East Asian languages, such as grammar, phonology and writing systems. We will also address sociolinguistic aspects of language such as politeness, dialect variation and the relationship between language and social constructs such as power and gender.

Credits: 40

Compulsory module

Your dissertation is your chance to take responsibility for your learning and conduct a piece of linguistic research on a topic you are passionate about. Your tutors will support you to refine your idea and encourage you to choose a topic that you enjoy and excel in. You will also attend 1 to 1 tutorials which will help you design and conduct your research and write up your findings.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching and learning

We deliver your modules through:

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Workshops.

Seminar groups usually have up to 30 students in a class.

You will usually take 3 modules per semester. Each has 3 to 4 hours of contact time. We schedule our taught sessions between 9:00am and 8:00pm, Monday to Friday. While studying in Japan you are likely to have more contact time. Details will depend on the host university you are studying at.

In addition to taught sessions you will have individual academic tutorials throughout each semester. You will need to engage in independent study outside of your contact time. This could include preparing for seminars, reading around topics discussed in lectures and writing assignments.

Our teaching draws on both our research and professional experience. This means your learning is informed by the most current thinking in the subject area. You can find out more about our research and backgrounds by visiting our staff pages.

Assessment

For your Japanese modules, assessment methods include oral exams, videos, class tests and written work. The assessment types for your other modules vary. These might include:

  • Blog posts
  • Data analysis
  • Essays
  • Exams
  • Presentations
  • Research proposals
  • Reports.

You will always receive feedback on the work you do. This will help you to improve your writing and your academic abilities.

Career outcomes

Your future with a degree in Japanese, Intercultural Communication and Linguistics

On this course you will develop an understanding of the complex relationships between different cultures. You will gain specialist skills in analysing language and presenting linguistic data. The transferrable skills you develop in communication, research and problem solving are in high demand in a range of careers.

This degree could be the first step toward your career as a:

  • Dictionary editor
  • Diplomatic service officer
  • Government social research officer
  • Intelligence analyst
  • International aid worker
  • Translator.

Discover more career options on Prospects careers advice pages.

You could also progress onto a postgraduate degree and take your learning even further.

 

Whatever your ambitions, we can help you get there.

Our careers service, LaunchPad provides career support tailored to your ambitions. Through this service you can access:

  • Employer events
  • LinkedIn, CV and cover letter sessions
  • Workshops on application writing and interview skills
  • Work experience and volunteering opportunities
  • Personalised career advice.

This support doesn't end when you graduate. You can access our expert career advice for the rest of your life. We will help you gain experience and confidence to succeed. It's your career, your way.

Entry requirements

Qualifications

Minimum Entry Requirements

    96 UCAS Tariff points

    3 GCSEs at grade C/4 (or equivalent) including English Language.

Calculate your UCAS Tariff points

International Students

If you are an international student you will need to show that your qualifications match our entry requirements.

Information about international qualifications and entry requirements can be found on our International pages.

If English is not your first language you will need to show that you have English Language competence at IELTS level 6.0 (with no skill below 5.5) or equivalent.

International entry requirements

Mature Learners Entry Scheme

If you have been out of education for 3 years or more and have a grade C GCSE in English Language or equivalent, you are eligible for our entry scheme for mature learners. It's a scheme that recognises non-traditional entry qualifications and experience for entry onto this course. Information on how to apply can be found on our dedicated page.

Mature entry offer scheme

Terms and conditions

Our terms and conditions, policies and procedures contain important information about studying at York St John University. You can read them on our Admissions page.

Fees and Funding

To study for an undergraduate degree with us, you will need to pay tuition fees for your course. How much you pay depends on whether you live inside the UK or EU, or internationally (outside the UK/EU). Tuition fees may be subject to inflation in future years.

UK and EU 2021 entry

The tuition fee for 2021 entry onto this course is £9,250 per year for full time study.

This price applies to all UK/EU, Jersey, Guernsey and Isle of Man students.

You can find out more about funding your degree by visiting our funding opportunities page.

Funding Opportunities

Placement year funding

If you choose to take a placement year, and your course offers it, you can apply for the Tuition Fee and Maintenance Loan for your placement year. How much you are awarded is based on the type of placement being undertaken and whether it is a paid or unpaid placement. The tuition fee for your placement year will be reduced.

Tuition Fees

    UK and EU 2021 entry £9,250 per year full time

    International 2021 entry £12,750 per year full time

International 2021 entry

The tuition fee for 2021 entry to this course is £12,750 per year for full time study.

This price applies to all students living outside the UK/EU.

Due to immigration laws, if you are an international student on a Student Visa, you must study full time. For more information about visa requirements and short-term study visas, please visit the International Visa and Immigration pages.

Find out more about funding your degree.

International Fees and Funding

Additional costs and financial support

There may also be some additional costs to take into account throughout your studies, including the cost of accommodation.

Course-related costs

While studying for your degree, there may be additional costs related to your course. This may include purchasing personal equipment and stationery, books and optional field trips.

Study Abroad

For more information on tuition fee reductions and additional costs for studying abroad, please visit our study abroad pages.

Accommodation and living costs

For detailed information on accommodation and living costs, visit our Accommodation pages.

Financial help and support

Our Funding Advice team are here to help you with your finances throughout your degree. They offer a personal service that can help you with funding your studies and budgeting for living expenses. 

All undergraduates receive financial support through the York St John Aspire card. Find out more about the Aspire scheme and how it can be used to help you purchase equipment you need for your course. 

ASPIRE CARD

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