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Undergraduate Course

Degree in Professional Policing BA (Hons)

This degree will give you the pre-join qualification you need to apply for a police officer role in England or Wales.

Students with a police officer

If your ambition is to join the police service in England and Wales then this course is for you. Topics we cover, the way we deliver teaching and the ways we assess you focus on developing skills that are directly related to a Police Officer’s work.

  • College of Policing logo

York campus

  • UCAS Code – L4L9
  • Duration – 3 years full time
  • Start date – September 2022
  • School – York Business School

Minimum Entry Requirements

    104 UCAS Tariff points

    3 GCSEs at grade C/4 (or equivalent) including English Language.

Tuition Fees

    UK and EU 2021 entry £9,250 per year full time

    International 2021 entry £12,750 per year full time

Discover why York St John is The One

Course overview

Police Officers in England and Wales are now required to hold a professional policing qualification. This degree is delivered under licence from the College of Policing and follows the National Policing Curriculum. Studying on it will put you in the best possible position to apply for the Police Service’s pre-join programme when you graduate. All of your modules will be delivered by experienced police professionals. We will introduce you to the policing profession through the study of:

  • Law
  • Policy and procedure
  • Criminal justice
  • Crime and deviance
  • Global policing issues.

Together we will confront some of the biggest issues facing the police service today, both in the UK and beyond. You will also consider how crime, policy, social inequalities and divisions can impact upon our understanding of policing. One essential theme which runs through the course is a focus on evidence based policing – a concept which is central to modern policing and a skill which is highly valued in the service.

Throughout the course you will have opportunities to gain hands on experience by working with vulnerable people across a diverse range of groups. This could be through our partnerships with police forces in Yorkshire and Humberside, or with some of the organisations that work alongside the police service and focus on:

  • Restorative justice
  • Support for victims of sexual assault and domestic abuse
  • Victim’s charities
  • Agencies supporting vulnerable people in society.

Course structure

Year 1

Our academic year is split into 2 semesters.

In your first year you will study:

  • 3 compulsory modules in semester 1
  • 3 compulsory modules in semester 2.

You can find out which modules are available in each semester on the Course Specifications.

Modules

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

On this module we will introduce you to the purpose and responsibilities of a modern police force. Policing within the UK rests upon various principles and is always evolving. The police are not separate from society, they are a part of society, yet at the same time, there are limitations to what they can do. You will use evidence based practice (EBP) research through articles, journals and other publications to contextualise your learning and identify good practice.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

On this module you will explore how the police service develops and maintains positive relationships with all sections of the community. We will investigate how society has changed as a result of immigration and the relationship between the police service and different communities. We will look at case studies, such as the Brixton Riots, the murder of Stephen Lawrence and the Macpherson Inquiry. You will consider how equality legislation has developed since the 1970s, culminating in the Equality Act 2010.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

On this module you will build the essential skills needed for study at university level. We will also help prepare you to take on the challenging entry procedures demanded by the police force. You will teach you a range of skills that are intended to improve your chance of securing a role within the police.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

On this module you will consider the development of the justice system historically and socially. We will look at the difference between the adversarial system and the inquisitorial system practice in many European countries. You will identify the different court systems and processes, including the different punishments and sanctions available. You will also review the legislative and policy changes connected with the treatment of victims, witnesses and offenders.

You will explore:

  • The police role in the criminal justice system
  • The relationship between the police service and the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS)
  • How different communities and individuals are treated by the justice system
  • Rehabilitation.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

On this module you will develop your understanding of what is commonly referred to as Community Policing in England and Wales. You will look at the development of Community Policing, as a response to public criticism of reactive based policing and a move to a more proactive approach. We will explore significant examples and the changing nature of community policing in a social and political context. We will introduce you to signal crimes and signal disorder and the development of problem-oriented policing (POP) and partnership working.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

The professionalisation of policing within the UK is calling for police officers who have the capacity to offer critique as part of a reflective approach to policing. It is no longer sufficient to train officers to deal with routine tasks; the complexity and diversity of UK society requires officers who have the ability to handle situations which are rarely routine. This module will introduce you to criminological perspectives on policing and crime reduction. You will gain a deeper understanding of what causes crime in the UK and of the initiatives being proposed and adopted to reduce it.

Year 2

In your second year you will study:

  • 3 compulsory modules in semester 1
  • 3 compulsory modules in semester 2.

You can find out which modules are available in each semester on the Course Specifications.

Modules

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

Evidence-based policing (EBP) has become increasingly important in recent years, reflecting a more general trend across public and social services. On this module you will develop your understanding of the ideas behind evidence-based policing (EBP) and ways of effectively designing such research. You will explore how research can be used to develop new approaches to policing or reinforce existing practices.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

On this module you will explore how response policing deals with situations that arise daily in routine policing. The types of incidents the police deal with vary and can prove to be extremely challenging. You will study the strategies for how those involved in response policing can remain effective and resilient in an increasingly challenging environment. 

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

On this module you will study the interrelationship between vulnerability and risk, looking at how some individuals and groups are vulnerable to offending behaviour and how the police can operate to reduce the risk of this. You will investigate approaches towards policing, such as early intervention and partnership working. We will cover:

  • The definition of vulnerability 
  • How a person becomes a victim
  • Theories about the onset of offending
  • Approaches to managing vulnerable people
  • Youth gangs targeting vulnerable people.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

On this module you will study the core function of the police service using the 3 Es of roads policing; Education, Engineering and Enforcement. We will explore the key road traffic legislation and policies relating to the use of vehicles, as well considering the use of vehicles in connection with crime and anti-social behaviour. You will investigate problem solving models, national strategies and policy developments which aim to make the use of roads safer. 

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

Intelligence underpins how policing operations are carried out and how the police collaborate with other agencies. On this module you will learn about the role of information and intelligence within policing. You will learn how the police are obliged to collect, store, and manage intelligence appropriately. You will consider how intelligence can be used in policing operations and how partner agencies can support operations through the sharing of information and intelligence.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

The role of the police includes carrying out investigations to amass evidence for the purpose of bringing cases to trial and achieving satisfactory outcomes within the criminal justice system. On this module you will explore the different aspects involved in investigating different types of crimes and criminal activity. You will investigate the social, political and legal context within which investigations are carried out.

Year 3

In your third year you will study:

  • 1 compulsory dissertation module across semesters 1 and 2
  • 2 compulsory modules in semester 1
  • 2 compulsory modules in semester 2.

You can find out which modules are available in each semester on the Course Specifications.

Modules

Credits: 40

Compulsory module

This module is your opportunity to apply your knowledge and focus your studies on the topic that interests you the most. You will choose a policing topic to research and investigate it in detail. You will conduct your research using a systematic, ethical and evidence-based approach, drawing on the skills you have learnt throughout your degree. An academic tutor will support you throughout the module, offering 1 to 1 advice and guidance on your research.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

Public protection is the reason the police force exists. It is what makes it different from a military force, which exists to protect the state, and it is the central purpose of policing. On this module you will learn about how the police work to protect the public. You will study:

  • The definitions, legislation and guidance associated with public protection
  • Links between organised crime and public protection issues
  • Misuse of police power
  • Media interpretations of public protection
  • Forms of abuse and the impact on victims
  • Relationships between abusers and victims.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

On this module you will investigate concepts of decision making and the use of discretion within policing. You will develop your understanding of the importance of keeping records, both for the individual and the police service as a whole. We will examine the National Decision Model (NDM) and you will learn how to apply the NDM to professional situations that arise daily within the context of policing.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

On this module you will examine how Terrorism is policed in the UK. You will explore the importance of the community and intelligence in countering terrorism locally, regionally, nationally and globally. You will also deliver a presentation investigating the effectiveness of both legislation and interventions in Counter Terrorism policing. On the module you will explore:

  • Radicalisation and extremism
  • What is meant by terrorist related offences
  • Royal prerogative and terrorist prevention intervention measures
  • The CONTEST strategy (the UK's counter-terrorism strategy)
  • The pillars of pursue, prevent, protect and prepare.

Credits: 20

Compulsory module

The rapid technological advancements of recent years has led to corresponding changes in crime. Policing has had to change to address new issues, new problems and new crimes. On this module you will engage with various issues relating to the digital world. You will investigate the prevalence of technology in modern society, exploring how we can use these new developments to our advantage in policing. You will learn about different types of digital crime, the impact they can have on individuals and families, and the legislation associated with them.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching and learning

We provide a positive learning environment in which you will experience a range of teaching styles and settings and a variety of approaches to learning. The teaching methods you will experience include:

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Workshops
  • Practical sessions
  • Small group work
  • 1 to 1 tutorials.

You will also be expected to carry out independent study outside of your timetabled sessions. This will include:

  • Reading
  • Project work
  • Engaging with the online virtual learning environment
  • Attending guest lectures and research seminars.

Our teaching draws on both our research and professional experience. This means your learning is informed by the most current thinking in the subject area. You can find out more about our research and backgrounds by visiting our staff pages.

Assessment

The assessment methods that you will encounter will reflect the requirements of the police service. This could include:

  • Portfolios
  • Policy documents
  • Operational policing plans
  • Reports
  • Case studies and reviews
  • Presentations
  • Multiple choice examinations (similar to those used in Police recruitment)
  • Essays
  • Interview and investigation plans
  • An extended dissertation in your final year.

Skills which are valued by employers, such as communication, presentational and organisational skills are embedded in your assessments.

To help you make the most of your assessments you will benefit from regular unassessed knowledge checks on police law, policy and procedure. You will receive feedback on your work as you move through each module. This will help you to improve your work for your graded assessments.

Career outcomes

Your future with a degree in Professional Policing

This degree will give you the pre-join qualification you need to apply for a police officer role in England or Wales. It will also give you the academic and life skills you need to contribute to a modern police service. You will study modules drawn directly from the College of Policing's national pre-join curriculum.

While successful completion of the course does not guarantee you a position in the Police Service, and you will still need to complete their application process, it will put you in a very strong position when you apply.

Whatever your ambitions, we can help you get there.

Our careers service, LaunchPad provides career support tailored to your ambitions. Through this service you can access:

  • Employer events
  • LinkedIn, CV and cover letter sessions
  • Workshops on application writing and interview skills
  • Work experience and volunteering opportunities
  • Personalised career advice.

This support doesn't end when you graduate. You can access our expert career advice for the rest of your life. We will help you gain experience and confidence to succeed. It's your career, your way.

Entry requirements

Qualifications

Minimum Entry Requirements

    104 UCAS Tariff points

    3 GCSEs at grade C/4 (or equivalent) including English Language.

Calculate your UCAS Tariff points

Before applying we advise that you check your eligibility to become a police constable. Visit the College of Policing website to find out more about entry requirements. While successful completion of the course does not guarantee you a position in the police service, and you will still need to complete their application process, it will put you in a very strong position when you apply.

International Students

If you are an international student you will need to show that your qualifications match our entry requirements.

Information about international qualifications and entry requirements can be found on our International pages.

If English is not your first language you will need to show that you have English Language competence at IELTS level 6.0 (with no skill below 5.5) or equivalent.

International entry requirements

This course is available with foundation year

If you do not yet meet the minimum requirements for entry straight onto this degree course, or feel you are not quite ready for the transition to Higher Education, this is a great option for you. Passing a foundation year guarantees you a place on this degree course the following academic year.

Law and Social Sciences foundation year

Mature Learners Entry Scheme

If you have been out of education for 3 years or more and have a grade C GCSE in English Language or equivalent, you are eligible for our entry scheme for mature learners. It's a scheme that recognises non-traditional entry qualifications and experience for entry onto this course. Information on how to apply can be found on our dedicated page.

Mature entry offer scheme

Terms and conditions

Our terms and conditions, policies and procedures contain important information about studying at York St John University. You can read them on our Admissions page.

Fees and Funding

To study for an undergraduate degree with us, you will need to pay tuition fees for your course. How much you pay depends on whether you live inside the UK or EU, or internationally (outside the UK/EU). Tuition fees may be subject to inflation in future years.

UK and EU 2021 entry

The tuition fee for 2021 entry onto this course is £9,250 per year for full time study.

This price applies to all UK/EU, Jersey, Guernsey and Isle of Man students.

You can find out more about funding your degree by visiting our funding opportunities page.

Funding Opportunities

Placement year funding

If you choose to take a placement year, and your course offers it, you can apply for the Tuition Fee and Maintenance Loan for your placement year. How much you are awarded is based on the type of placement being undertaken and whether it is a paid or unpaid placement. The tuition fee for your placement year will be reduced.

Tuition Fees

    UK and EU 2021 entry £9,250 per year full time

    International 2021 entry £12,750 per year full time

International 2021 entry

The tuition fee for 2021 entry to this course is £12,750 per year for full time study.

This price applies to all students living outside the UK/EU.

Due to immigration laws, if you are an international student on a Student Visa, you must study full time. For more information about visa requirements and short-term study visas, please visit the International Visa and Immigration pages.

Find out more about funding your degree.

International Fees and Funding

Additional costs and financial support

There may also be some additional costs to take into account throughout your studies, including the cost of accommodation.

Course-related costs

While studying for your degree, there may be additional costs related to your course. This may include purchasing personal equipment and stationery, books and optional field trips.

Study Abroad

For more information on tuition fee reductions and additional costs for studying abroad, please visit our study abroad pages.

Accommodation and living costs

For detailed information on accommodation and living costs, visit our Accommodation pages.

Financial help and support

Our Funding Advice team are here to help you with your finances throughout your degree. They offer a personal service that can help you with funding your studies and budgeting for living expenses.

For advice on everything from applying for scholarships to finding additional financial support email fundingadvice@yorksj.ac.uk

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